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Heptade

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About Heptade

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    Les Ténèbres

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    Male
  • Location
    Montreal, Quebec

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  • Favorite Fire Emblem Game
    Fates

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    Volke

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  • I fight for...
    Tellius

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  1. They indeed do deserve to be mentioned, though I'm a relative newcomer to metal. I have some prog metal albums (Dream Theater, Tool, Opeth, Symphony X, Pain of Salvation, etc.), but I haven't yet really delved into Voivod's and Gorguts' discographies. I do remember watching an interview with Voivod's drummer on local TV, and being surprised that he happened to be a soft-spoken, intellectual proghead.
  2. Now this is a topic I can get behind! I'll go with A Plague of Lighthouse Keepers by Van der Graaf Generator. I'll also add a band from my native Québec in Harmonium: This whole prog-folk concept album, where each song is based on a season, with the last one being an instrumental masterpiece representing an hypothetical fifth season, is one of my all-time favourite. If you're to listen to only one of their songs, go with Depuis l'automne, which magnificently depicts autumn's melancholy. Also check out their following album, L'Heptade, which is my namesake here. Great symphonic prog. Their debut is great as well, but it's not really prog. Still, if you like folk, I'd recommend it wholeheartedly. They were HUGE here during the seventies. Sadly, lead singer/guitarist/composer Serge Fiori had a mental breakdown (he has seemingly gotten better since, but has yet to get back on the stage, which cut their career short after only three albums. The French-Canadian prog scene left quite a few gems behind. The ProgQuébec label has made it its mission to recover some of those. I'll suggest you guys check Octobre, Morse Code, Maneige, Sloche, among others. (Forgive my patriotic pride...) You haven't heard the last of me in this great topic.
  3. Um... I respectfully disagree... Yeah, the Mage vs. Mage aspect is definitely an afterthought in the games that used the triangle, but I enjoyed the variety of characters that the magic triangle brought. Also, the Dark tomes always had neat abilities. Why not make it so that the two other types have some unique spells as well? Though I quite enjoyed the new double triangle introduced in Fates (which I will note proves that they can do 2 triangles that do matter in a single game), the old magic triangle strikes nostalgic chords within me, and I was a bit disappointed that they never made it matter more than it did.
  4. I'd like to see the GBA magic triangle once again, so I guess I'd have Bishops come back. And Dark Mages need to drop anima.
  5. In the GBA titles and PoR, I basically decided on my endgame team whenever I started a run. I usually made somewhat thematic teams in which each character I planned to use had to get one A-rank support. Usually, it would be either character-centric or nation-centric, though there would usually be at least a couple of units that had little or nothing to do with the theme, that would get fully used (A-support and all) in order to field a full roster. I would also use other characters at times, but my endgame team would be composed only of those chosen at the beginning, which at times forced me to use otherwise subpar units, or to find a way to make RNG-screwed ones useful in their own way (i.e. making their support partner even better, or utility unrelated to stats, etc.) In later titles, I try to do something like that, though the lack of restriction on supports allows for much more leniency. I like to try as many characters as possible, and to get to know them. Some have been pleasant surprises, both gameplay and story wise. Had I followed the experts' opinions, I would never have gotten that ridiculously blessed Odin (maxed Mag at 20/13) who made Nosfera-tanking a reliable strategy in Conquest Hard. I also got an Amelia who was a complete tank (and who dodged everything anyway)and crit machine, made even more awesome through her support with Franz (who got so hilariously RNG-screwed (5 consecutive HP-only levels, and his other levels were nothing to write home about) that being a support bot was basically his only use). Yeah, it means little in regards to actual numbers, but, for me, personal experience is what makes FE great. I don't really care about efficiency. In fact, support grinding in the Elibe games makes it basically impossible for me to get anything but one star in my Tactics rank. I never turtle, nor do I skip sidequests; I just don't get stressed over the turn count (well, except when it means more than a star on your report).
  6. Rebalancing of some units (i.e. make Sophia/Wendy actually worth it if you go through the hell of training them, or that Archers and Knights aren't near-useless by default). A better support system, that doesn't require support-grinding for hundreds of turns while doing nothing else (more paired endings as well). They should rewrite the script, so that at least some characters are only wounded when they "die", so that some might still appear in cutscenes after their initial recruitment (only Roy, Merlinus and Guinivere became repetitive after a while). Better in-game hints as to how to recruit some characters/obtain sidequests, so that following a guide isn't an absolute necessity. Some cameos from FE7 characters. I could easily see Oswin die alongside Hector, Lucius sacrificing himself for the orphans, Lowen as the army's cook, Rebecca as Eliwood's retainer, Rath could be seen among the Kutolah. Maybe a few more sidequests that would tie-in some FE7 plot points. I wouldn't make it a 2-generation game with FE7, since only a handful of FE6 characters are the children of playable FE7 units. A handful of new characters, whether playable or not (like they did with the existing remakes). EDIT: And, as the post below me reminded me, either promotion or higher level cap for the thieves. And some solution to Roy's late promotion issue.
  7. Having just gone through HHM, I was wondering about something. How come Nils and Ninian don't seem to know Nergal is their father? I mean, in the flashback from 19xx, Ninian at least seemed old enough to have a clear recollection of him. I understand that he looked way older, and that his total change personality might have overridden the passing resemblance. But Nils mentioned he had recognized the "voice of an old friend" calling them through the Dragon's Gate. And, as far as we know, Nergal was always his name, as Athos, who has known him for centuries, only ever refers to him as Nergal. If he once had bore another name, surely it would have been mentioned at some point. Don't they remember the name of their own father? How does it not occur to them that the man whose voice sounds like their father's, probably resembles their father at least a little bit physically, and shares their father's name might actually be their father? Are they in complete denial? Refusing to admit to themselves that their once loving father could have become such a despicable human being? As Nergal dies, Nils does seem to recognize him somewhat, yet only subconsciously, as he is genuinely confused as to why he feels sad. Granted, Nils was very young at the time, so it might make sense for him not to remember much. Still, it's implied he remembered what Nergal's voice sounded like. Thoughts? By the way, I find it quite interesting that Nergal actually accomplished his objective before the beginning of the game, yet never realized it.
  8. Yeah, I figured. That was the one chest I had not opened in any of my tries. Anyway, I finally beat the damn chapter, and didn't need the staff. There wasn't a single enemy left alive by the 12th turn (does killing Ursula halt the enemy reinforcements?). All four chests were opened, and Dorcas' speed grew two levels in a row.
  9. I had thought about it, but, as far as I know, there is no way to have a Rescue staff at that point. And if there is, I've missed it anyway. In any case, Ursula herself is no longer much of a threat, as Rath's Brave Bow one-rounds her as long as she doesn't switch to Elfire, and he can survive a Bolting plus the four Mercs. Now I just have to wait and hope the stars align so that Zephiel and Jaffar both survive. It's a shame, since it's such a good chapter thematically.
  10. Yeah, I thought it was something like that... Thanks! Guess I'll either have to kill her or deplete her Bolting before turn 13.
  11. Battle Before Dawn. That dreaded chapter. Jaffar survived through 12 turns. Maxime is dead. In fact, except for Ursula and her Mercenary squad, all enemies are dead. All my units are alive. I know where Ursula is. She used Bolting exactly once. She has never moved. My level 20/-- Hector being little more than dead weight at this point, I had left him and Nino where the latter was recruited. For at least five turns, they didn't do anything, and no one attacked them. Then suddenly, Ursula moves and one-shots Nino with her Bolting. What prompted that? Is this well-documented? I mean, all my strategy was made thinking Ursula was immobile (which I believe she is in all other modes, unless I always killed her too quickly for her movement to matter). Florina and Rath could probably take her on, but that means Zephiel will be put at risk... As if a Bolting tome in FoW wasn't bullshit enough... Anyway, thanks in advance.
  12. I prefer Hector to Eliwood. I like Eliwood, and he's always a good unit for me, despite his reputation. But his personality is a bit too stereotypically heroic. He doesn't feel very original. I really like Linus, but Lloyd is possibly my favorite secondary antagonist. Whether they are well-intentioned or not, most Black Fang members feel like members of a medieval outlaw group. Whenever such a group is depicted in fiction, you can expect for there to be people like Linus, Brendan, Jan, Legault, Jaffar, Uhai, Jerme, Ursula, etc. Those characters, whether sympathetic or not, all feel like outlaws. Lloyd is different in that he looks and speaks and acts mostly like the heroic scion of a noble house, except that he is one of the leaders of a criminal league, and quite an effective one at that, which he remains to the bitter end. For those who have read A Song of Ice and Fire, he reminds me a bit of Beric Dondarrion, leader of the Brotherhood without Banners, in that they both are competent, high-ranked figures in an originally somewhat heroic outlaw clan that unwittingly got involved with some mysterious magic stuff, yet neither feels like an outlaw boss. Of course, the analogy is imperfect, as Beric is in fact the head of a noble house who became a bandit through a series of circumstances, but I still see quite a few similarities. (I'm talking here about the book version of Beric. While I do love the Richard Dormer's portrayal of the character in the TV show, the format made it so that his noble background is merely quickly alluded to, and he only gets a cameo as a handsome youth before getting heavily scarred and actually looking like a criminal. So the "strangeness" of such a character in such a role is much less striking.)
  13. Hmmm... I see the phenomenon known as Diogo is no longer contained within GameFAQs... Will we soon have debates on whether Clive can remove his armor, and thus dodge lightning, in one second by merely flexing his muscles, here at Serenes Forest? Those are strange times that we live in...
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