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starburst

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  • Favorite Fire Emblem Game
    Fates: Conquest

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    Nohr

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  1. If anything, Fates's percentages are truer, more real, which lets you assess situations more faithfully. Even as a Pop Star, Azura has great Strength, Speed and Skill, and she is actually an excellent physical Player-Phase unit, like Sniper or Berserker. She lands critical hits like crazy and has the growths to one-hit many enemies (and to one-round them all.) She is made of paper, but Defence and HP are basically irrelevant on Player-Phase units, for a 1-HP unit hits as hard as a 45-HP one, and they should always wipe screens. Azura's growths are so good that her children are great too. Sophie, Soleil, Nina, Velouria... they all are powerful with Smurfette as their mama.
  2. If you press Enter at story segments on Conquest then you are left with the best gameplay of the entire series. 😜 I have fun with those 80's sex comedies and do not mind some dirty jokes and skin here and there. Yet, while the pandering in Conquest is undeniable, the only interaction with actual sexual references that I can think of is a dialogue between Niles and Felicia. And it is actually funny.
  3. Identifying which units can do X and which can do Y is how one improves as a player. Only after experiencing how units and classes behave in different situations is that the player can anticipate which units will be used for certain approaches. I do not know how you play the game, but I do not move my entire party and simulate attacks with all units until I get the desired outcome; I pick units for certain tasks and move them accordingly. I do not always succeed, obviously, but I know beforehand what each unit should do and where it should go. It is less about arithmetic and more about knowing your offensive and defensive thresholds. The better one knows how units and classes behave, the less numbers one calculates, the less simulations one does, and the faster one advances. It is a feeling. I often say that I play Conquest as a puzzle, and that is exactly why I prefer it over every other Fire Emblem game that I have tried. Precisely because I must find a solution is that I enjoy it so much. In contrast, in Four Houses there was never an incentive to know how the units or the classes behave. They could be used interchangeably, wield any weapon and attack any enemy without ever being in real danger. There was nothing to analyse, just move forward. The awful map design did not help either. I do not agree with you in that once one completes a map, one knows how to complete others. Hell, completing a map does not even guarantee that one can complete it again with a different party. Even if one repeated the exact same approach, different units and different classes would behave differently in battle, forcing one to adapt and learn. The fact that chance is factored in every battle ensures that every replay of a map is unique, even if one repeated the exact same party. I can play (and have played) Conquest dozens of times and still enjoy every campaign. Sure, I increase the challenge through some restrictions, but numerous sections and maps are always thrilling and make me think about how to tackle them with the tools at hand. This thrill, this challenging emotion is something that other Fire Emblem entries that I have tried fail to deliver. (Note that the way I play the game, it takes place almost exclusively on Player Phase, which increases the player input and grants more control over the development of the battles.) Having said that, I agree with you in that Fire Emblem's general gameplay lacks something: Challenge and thrill!
  4. I know. I added the comment about the 1 € find because the issue was more related to the logic behind its use than to the skill itself. Please, do note that while I am addressing you now, these commentaries are not about you in particular. It is nothing personal. 😉 Vow of Friendship is always a net gain, one simply takes advantage of it when it activates and heals afterwards. There is nothing to think about. If Corrin is never hit, it does not activate, and if she is indeed hit then Silas gets a bonus. Where is the problem? Would one prefer not to get a bonus? One might want to get hit and be granted a turn of Phoenix Mode for the entire party in return. Well, I would to, but this scenario does not exist! It was never an option. I am only given a bonus for Silas, why would I not make the most out of it? One does not plan every move with Dragon Fang or Luna or Vengeance or a critical hit in mind, but when they activate they increase the damage output. Criticising this increase on the basis that it did not happen when one wanted to makes no sense. It is the 1 € find in the park! Moreover, when one already is in a situation where the damage output is not enough to wipe the area and the enemy might kill one of their units on Enemy Phase, one can either restart because one cannot kill it with any combination of normal hits, or one makes a bet and use units with activation skills or a high critical hit chance. The analysis is very simple: One loses without trying or one bets for a win. If every unit had unrestricted access to all skills, I would obviously pick Trample and Aggressor and +4 Attack and +5 Speed and +30 Avoid at Level 1 on all of them. But, again, this scenario does not exist! Precisely because I am not picking an activation skill over a high fixed bonus is that I value what the activation offers and make the most out of it. And you are absolute right, mate. I agree with all of your points about the importance of flight. It opens up many gameplay options. It was the counter argument that I expected. Yet, and you will agree with me on this, a party of ten Wyverns is unequivocally less effective than a diverse, specialised party of ten. Even though the hype suggests the opposite. As if having access to the Wyvern class were an end by itself. Mine was more a commentary on the Wyvern class tree than about your choice. It was not about you in particular, mate. I have fun using Wyverns, but I do not idolise them like others (not you) do. You still need to factor Speed, but I would go even further and argue that the Bolt Axe is the only way to equalise the damage output of Malig Knight and Strategist Elise. Access to flight and, ironically, to Rally Defence are the main reasons why I would pick Malig Knight Elise.
  5. For me, the skills are the only reason to choose the Wyvern tree, and not the class themselves. Unless you are Camilla, who is broken by design, or Cornflakes, who can personalise her stats and caps, the Wyvern classes are not strong enough to one-hit nor fast enough to double. No other unit can do what Camilla does early to mid game in the same class, simply because no one else has the stats to pull it off. This is very clear in smaller parties, where you need as much might as possible on every action, and Wyvern Lords or Malig Knights simply do not meet the offensive thresholds. Another example, turn Elise into a Malig Knight: She will always cap Magic and Speed and produce a greater damage output (both in single and in double hits) as a Strategist, because at any given level she will have both more Magic and Speed. It is only after she gets Trample that the single hits between Malig Knight and Strategist equalise. And even then, Trample does not guarantee one-hitting, and as Strategist she will always double more enemies than as Malig Knight. At least a Wyvern Lord can be one of your main "tanks", and therefore has an excuse for not being able to kill enemies, but specialised units like Sorcerer, Berserker or Sniper will always deliver more kills than a Wyvern Lord. And I am pretty sure that Woldssegner Keaton or Velouria also deal more damage. In bigger parties where you can have "extra" units to deliver the kills, this is less evident, for the Wyvern tree does produce useful "extra" units. But when every action must translate into kills, the Wyvern classes are never the best option. I would always take Nohr Noble over Malig Knight for a +Magic Corrin. Either you did not understand how Vengeance works or you are not thinking straight. It does not trigger based on how low your HP is, but on your Skill; it triggers even if you HP is full (it simply adds no damage.) If a unit is going into Enemy Phase, it means that you already calculated the damage that would be received, and your unit cannot heal until after the phase ends anyway. If Vengeance triggers, the unit will deal more damage because it had just been hit; if it does not trigger, the forecasted scenario occurs. It is a net gain! It is like that stupid argument against the Mess Hall or the Lottery, saying that it is better to avoid them because you cannot know what you get! 😂 If you are running in park and find 1 €, you are clearly in a better situation than you were before. It is very simple. You might want 5 €, but why would you complain about or throw away the 1 € find?! It goes against the very basis of rational behaviour. Two completely different units like a General and a Berserker would always want Vengeance. I would not suggest to level-up them three times as Sorcerer to get it, yet the synergy among the classes is independent of the fact that both classes would obviously benefit from Vengeance. In our case, the synergy between Sorcerer and Nohr Noble is not an issue.
  6. Heresy! The Hero of the Ages does need some investment in a couple of chapters, but by Chapter 10 he goes the full Walking Dead against the Onis and can tank them indefinitely with +Mag Cornflakes. Furthermore, her daughter is the most broken unit in the game. Embrace the one, true light. Sponsored by Chosen Ones Inc. It would be the most broken skill otherwise! Rend Heaven is still very useful on Master Ninjas, Mechanists, Snipers, Generals and Heroes, for example, for they have high Skill, target Defence and face strong enemies. (Your only access to it is through Cornflakes, though.) If anything, it tells you that the offensive and defensive thresholds are lower than what you imagined, and that the royals are never needed. The game takes place almost exclusively on Player Phase, and demands evenly levelled units and specialised ones to march forward. You can beat Lunatic Endgame with ten units, no royals and no "backpacks", but I would not say that you can do it with any party. On the other hand, I am pretty sure that you can complete all maps up to Chapter 27 with any (not meme) combination of ten units. (Chapter 25 might be the other exception if your Corrin is fragile.) I am not afraid of Endgame on Lunatic, I simply do not find it fun to plan ahead my entire party with that chapter in mind. That being said, once you reach Endgame, go for it. Perseverance is always commendable, and one should never quit just because.
  7. That is a simple yet versatile build for Cornflakes. Nohr Noble is a perfectly capable final class for her: Fast to double most enemies, powerful against the lower defensive stat of most enemies, reliable 1-2 range, the best de-buff in the game in Draconic Hex, and capable of being your main “tank” during the entire game through the Dragon Stones (with the Plus one, she even one-hits numerous enemies in the last third of the game.) A simple re-classing that benefits her is Dark Mage/ Sorcerer for two or three level-ups. The -20 % Enemy Avoid skill ensures that every Dragon Stone hit will connect, the other skill grants +2 magical damage and Vengeance is useful on “tanks.” (Conquest’s defensive thresholds are actually not that high.) Not to mention that the re-classing itself is into a class that has synergy with her base one (tomes, Magic, Speed.) I usually re-class her in Chapter 16, which is relatively easy, or in 17, which is slow paced. Other simple, useful options are: +30 Avoid and Vantage from Samurai; +4 Attack and +40 Hit from Sniper; Elbow Room and Shelter from Cavalier; +5 Speed from Pegasus Ladies… (I tend to ignore level 35 skills because they are only useful for the last couple of chapters and I prefer skills that improve units for most of the game.) Rend Heaven is useless for spell casters because it would use the Magic stat of the enemy for the extra damage, which is null on anyone but mages. I need the slightest excuse to replay Conquest, so that was probably my encouraging others to try some challenges. You are always welcome to try a 10-units, no royals, no “backpacks” campaign. 😜 This may sound odd but it is a sincere tip: Consider Conquest on Lunatic as “complete” after you defeat Garon in Chapter 27; do not plan your entire party with Endgame in mind. It will free you to try many more combinations and enjoy the game in different ways. Endgame on Lunatic is not even an interesting puzzle, precisely because we all know how to cheese it. It is simply very specific. Bragging rights are secondary to the joy of the previous 27 chapters with diverse party combinations.
  8. I burst out laughing. 🤣 Ironically, Minnie's voice has never bothered me, at least not the one from the early years or the one from the few "recent" cartoons that I have watched (none from this century.) I actually prefer her voice over Mickey's. The problem with Mercedes's is that she is supposed to be human and not a children's cartoon.
  9. You two are far too kind: Mercedes's fake voice is reason enough for me to kill her on sight. And I only played Blue Lions. 😂 The same happened to me with Jakob in Conquest, who somehow always committed suicide very early in the game. Poor soul. On the contrary, I love Hapi's voice and dialogues. That voice acting is the highlight of the entire game for me.
  10. Congratulations, mate! Completing Conquest always feels like an achievement because it is an entertaining, challenging puzzle Others have given great, detailed input about your concerns, thus I will only mention some notes. - If you enjoyed Conquest (and it seems to me that you did), just keep playing Conquest, honestly. There are countless ways to spice it up and take pleasure in replays. Its real appeal is in its gameplay, and you can always press Start at any story-related "interruption" and keep on playing. I have completed it numerous times and I still feel the thrill at several sections, for each campaign is unique. Birthright and Revelation are nowhere near as challenging and entertaining. Of course, if you want to try different classes, know different characters or see a different-yet-equally-lame story, try them. I would never purchase them. - Conquest on Hard teaches you almost everything that you need to know about Lunatic, and the great majority of strategies can be replayed. Conquest on Normal is an entirely different game, as are Birthright and Revelation. - Awakening, like Birthright, has no map design, and it also breaks unless you restrict yourself. It can be enjoyed as a traditional turn-based RPG, but do not expect anything tactical. If you liked or at least tolerated the silly characters of Conquest, you will surely like the ones in Awakening. Echoes has an even simpler gameplay, but it its presentation is beautiful. Seriously, it is worth trying at least once. Ask someone to lend it to you for a weekend, or wait for a big sale. I do wish that its maps were more entertaining. - Try Conquest without "backpacks", it will let you know the units in a different light.
  11. Just to clarify, while "low-manning" often translates into "pick the strongest and turn them into monsters", this is actually my main complain about Fate's gameplay. The actual "rules" were 10-units only, no pre-promoted royals, no "backpacks." This last requirement was set precisely to counter the exploitation of pair-up bonuses between units at completely uneven levels. By using less units one will need as many actions as possible, which in turn translates into necessarily having a balanced cast, for everyone must meet offensive thresholds or the party will not be able to advance. The way I play it, Conquest takes place almost entirely on Player Phase. I pick one healer, two "tanks" and seven Player-Phase units, the party wipes the screen on Player Phase and marches forward to the next section. Most units do nothing during Enemy Phase, it does not exist. How hard do Hans and his General guards hit? I would not know! They are gone before they can ever attack. I am not trying to convince you, for this may not suit your play style. I only mention this because even though the party is smaller, it works in the complete opposite sense as "low-manning" would suggest. Enemy Phase is relegated to particular sections, and the immense majority of the game takes place on Player Phase. If anything, it tells you that the offensive and defensive thresholds in Conquest are always lower than you imagined, and that the royals are never necessary. Cross formation, mate. It never fails, regardless of the party.
  12. Now I get your comment about those maps. I thought that you were talking about the ones whose game play changed from Hard to Lunatic. And you are right about Inevitable End; what we get on Lunatic Chapter 17 is Master Ninjas with Poison Strike plus Grizzly Wound. My bad. You are welcome to join the very select club, mate. Applications are open for a limited time only. 😜
  13. Overpaying for a Nintendo Switch in mid 2018 and keeping it in its box for about ten months, "just for the new Fire Emblem game." And the game was terrible disappointment for me. The silver lining? Being a previous model, the device could be hacked, which has allowed me to try many other games before purchasing them. In-game: Thinking, for many months and across various campaigns, that Beast Stones in Conquest were considered "red" and part of the Weapon Triangle. 😬 I will surely remember more silly things and come back.
  14. The following message from this thread will forever haunt you, mate. 😈 Four months later, you got the answer by yourself. At least you now know that the offensive and defensive thresholds can always be met with less units and no royals. Conquest on Hard is challenging, but it is always fair. On Lunatic, it is fair for twenty seven chapters. 😜
  15. It makes sense. But it is a style. The way I play it, eight out of the ten units do nothing active during 99 % of Enemy Phases in the game. They may provide auras and bonuses, but they see no action. Conversely, they charge and (try to) clear zones on every Player Phase. Not to mention that the defensive thresholds are never that high in Conquest. That is why a +Magic Nohr Noble Cornflakes can be your main “tank” during the entire campaign. Or why numerous, diverse cavalry units can tank foxes indefinitely on Chapter 19. It is easy to meet the thresholds. Bulk for me is only relevant to calculate the one hit (if any) between one-rounding enemies. Player-Phase units at 1 HP can be just as effective as at 45 HP. The key is to kill the enemies, not to hold them. This is why weapons like the Sacrificial Knife or the Berserker Axe are so good; the HP loss is irrelevant for Player-Phase units if there are no enemies left. I would gladly take +5 Speed, +4 Attack or +30 % Avoid on a Sorcerer instead of Vantage. It hardly ever activates on Ophelia during the whole campaign. And she always joins around Chapter 12 and ends at A proficiency in tomes (this is, she sees a lot of action.) Again, it depends on what you want to do.
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