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I've had three part time jobs in total (one of them being a Brand Ambassador for Nintendo last summer) but I currently work part-time for a smoothie bar. There was an instance of an older female customer who wanted two smoothies. After I punched in her order and she gave me the requested amount, she asked me for the prices for the bigger version of the smoothie she got. I told her and she told me she wanted the bigger size instead. Since she already paid and I was still being trained, I didn't want to mess up the refund so I called over a co-worker to show me.

Customer: Why can't you do it?

Me: I'm still being trained and I don't want to mess up your refund.

Customer: But it's your JOB. You should already know how to do things.

Me: Like I said, I'm still being trained. We'll have your smoothie prepared while we get this sorted out.

She kind of grumbled to herself and after my co-worker did the refund and I punched in her new order, she was very focused on my co-worker, who was working on her drink. When he started to come around to put in the fruits before blending, she practically leaned over to inspect the jug and said,

Lady: I don't think there's any spinach in that. Go back and put spinach.

Co-worker: -shakes the jug a little to show that there was spinach in it- They're in there, ma'am. They're just under the fruit.

Lady: ...Fine.

He finished with her order and she took it and went on her way.

There was another instance of a different older lady who didn't want to pay the $7 price for the large smoothie and pointed to a man who just picked up his smoothie and was like,

Lady: But I saw that he got his for $5.

Me: He probably used a coupon. 

Her caretaker told her that she didn't have a coupon and that if she didn't want to pay for the larger smoothie, she can get the smaller one. She huffed to herself and paid for the big one anyway. Older customers can be a little hard to deal with aha.

 

 

Edited by carefreejules

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So I work with preschool age kids...

And one day there was this one little girl playing with this little ice cream stand that we have. Well, one of the other kids pretended to call her on the phone, and she replies "What kind of ice cream do you want?". The other kid said she didn't want anything, so the little girl at the ice cream stand then went "Then don't call me!" in a really sassy tone! XD It made me and my coworker laugh so hard.

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29 minutes ago, carefreejules said:

I've had three part time jobs in total (one of them being a Brand Ambassador for Nintendo last summer) but I currently work part-time for a smoothie bar. There was an instance of an older female customer who wanted two smoothies. After I punched in her order and she gave me the requested amount, she asked me for the prices for the bigger version of the smoothie she got. I told her and she told me she wanted the bigger size instead. Since she already paid and I was still being trained, I didn't want to mess up the refund so I called over a co-worker to show me.

Customer: Why can't you do it?

Me: I'm still being trained and I don't want to mess up your refund.

Customer: But it's your JOB. You should already know how to do things. Reminds me of those videos on entitled parents. Then again, this sounds rather entitled.

Me: Like I said, I'm still being trained. We'll have your smoothie prepared while we get this sorted out.

She kind of grumbled to herself and after my co-worker did the refund and I punched in her new order, she was very focused on my co-worker, who was working on her drink. When he started to come around to put in the fruits before blending, she practically leaned over to inspect the jug and said,

Lady: I don't think there's any spinach in that. Go back and put spinach.

Co-worker: -shakes the jug a little to show that there was spinach in it- They're in there, ma'am. They're just under the fruit.

Lady: ...Fine.

He finished with her order and she took it and went on her way. I still don’t get much of the appeal of vegetable smoothies. Then again, I’m used to fruit smoothies with some amount of sugar. I guess sugars (though it’s simple sugars, not complex sugars) being the real culprit behind obesity has gotten to people now.

There was another instance of a different older lady who didn't want to pay the $7 price for the large smoothie and pointed to a man who just picked up his smoothie and was like,

Lady: But I saw that he got his for $5.

Me: He probably used a coupon. 

Her caretaker told her that she didn't have a coupon and that if she didn't want to pay for the larger smoothie, she can get the smaller one. She huffed to herself and paid for the big one anyway. Older customers can be a little hard to deal with aha.

Responses in bold. Also...

8 minutes ago, DancingDanny said:

So I work with preschool age kids...

And one day there was this one little girl playing with this little ice cream stand that we have. Well, one of the other kids pretended to call her on the phone, and she replies "What kind of ice cream do you want?". The other kid said she didn't want anything, so the little girl at the ice cream stand then went "Then don't call me!" in a really sassy tone! XD It made me and my coworker laugh so hard.

One of the first things I thought of was a little children’s book. It was called “Child’s First Prank Call”.

This does not exist, I just made it up.

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I worked at a summer camp run by my neighbor a couple years ago and I had been doing it for a few years prior to that, although it wasn't really a summer camp and more like a day camp for parents to leave their kids at. Anyway, it was the summer before my sophomore year of high school, and we were on a field trip to a public pool. Not exactly my idea of a field trip, but I don't care enough to question business practices.

We were getting ready to head back, and we were having the kids change into dry clothes in the bathroom stalls, but one of them who was special needs said something that I don't remember, and he ran out of the stall he was in to go back out to the pool. The only problem was that he was stark naked. Thankfully, one of the senior counselors caught him in a pool towel before he could even get out of the bathroom.

Edited by indigocean

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The vegetable smoothies are balanced out with fruit so the taste of them isn't that strong haha.

There have been other instances of customers asking for just fruit in their smoothies and, regardless of whether the fruits are fresh or frozen, there needs to be some sort of liquid to blend it all together. Juices help bring out the taste of the fruit but sometimes customers ask for water instead (which isn't surprising since we get plenty of customers who really want to make sure there are no added sugars in their drink - not even from juices from concentrate) and then they come back surprised on how it tastes bland, even though we warned them that that would happen. 

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31 minutes ago, Azure in a Roundabout said:

Responses in bold. Also...

One of the first things I thought of was a little children’s book. It was called “Child’s First Prank Call”.

This does not exist, I just made it up.

Please put in spoiler tags your super duper long comments. For easier scrolling! :P

 

Spoiler

INSERT SUPER DUPER BIG TEXT HERE

 

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When I was doing volunteer work back in my city's public library, I was washing some windows when there was suddenly a bunch of commotion and one of the actual employees walked into the section I was in (it was a young adults section, separated from the kids section by glass paneling and doors) to watch something unfold.  Some kid was having a crazy tantrum - screaming, kicking, all that jazz - and was pinned to the ground by some woman (maybe the mother or some other employee).  I was told by the employee who walked into where I was that this kid was on the autism spectrum, which I responded to by saying I also was on it.  Anyway, the kid eventually stopped and left.  It's crazy how often that kind of thing seems to happen in public places.

Also will say that a couple times while working for Uber Eats, I had to deliver food inside places of business.  Once was in a thrift store I had issues finding, and then going in I spent a hot minute finding the recipient.  Another time, funnily enough, was in a pizza joint, which was my first time delivering it to a place of business so I had just assumed it'd be an apartment instead which meant that I spent a bit of time trying to find the place.  The worst are always apartments, because I can never just find the exact apartment right away.  Conversely, I have no issue with long deliveries out of the main city that take me 10-20 minutes longer and only reward me with, like, two more dollars than normal.

 

@carefreejules I'm so glad independent delivery doesn't result in that kind of crap.  Even the older customers aren't all that awful, and in fact they're quite a bit more gracious than some of the younger customers (I guess because by nature of them using the app, they embrace tech and appreciate younger generations more than their sour soccer mom cousins).  The older customers always seem to give the most substantial tips.  Though being a millennial myself, I understand how many younger folks might not be able to shell out much in tips.

The worst prospect of customer service, in my opinion, isn't myself getting berated as much as it'd be a coworker getting berated.  I don't rightly give a damn what poison someone has to spew at me, but if they made someone else I work with feel threatened or otherwise uncomfortable, I'd lose my head.  It's why I work independent in the first place; I don't want to have to worry about the performance or wellbeing of other people.  And I also just really hate the idea of workplace politics, knowing a few who have to deal with that kind of unfair treatment all the time.

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I just want to know what the fuck Ice Dragon's job is that allows him to spend thousands every month on FEH. 

I want that story. 

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I would love to join this conversation, but I think my job prohibits me on giving out too much information. But let's just say some of the clientele I've had to work with had expectations about what we do that we have never offered nor have we advertised.

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I was going to be an inventory clerk as my first job at a Farmers Market, but since they didn't have the equipment set up on the first day, I had to do some random jobs around the building instead (thankfully, they warned me about that ahead of time). While most of it was the usual "sweep the floor" or "move these supplies" stuff (although I did get to paint a table, which was fun, even if it permanently made one pair of pants work clothes), I did get to test out whether or not some RC cars worked. Sounds fun, right? Try saying that after scouring to find about a dozen controllers, testing to see if any of them worked or had batteries in the first place, and trying to determine if it was the controller that was broken or the car.

They had the computer and scanner I would be using up and running the next day, where I found out I would be the first guy to have such a job, meaning that while the manager had a good idea about how the products would be tracked in the database, there were going to be a few things I would be creating on the fly. I also learned that the names of beauty and food products and the companies that make them are completely different, while engineering/hardware equipment is the exact opposite. Even today, there are times when I flip a box over to see if the company and product name have anything to do with each other. It was just a summer job, so I only worked there a few months, but it was still nice to hear that the system I helped put into place was helpful to a future employee that actually used it.

...

The moment I graduated from college (but before the ceremonies and all that), the very next day, my mother woke me up an said "you're getting a job". Cue going to the hiring center, having to find and complete tax information, doing an on-the-spot interview, a drug test, and watching a safety video. All without having any idea about what I would be doing at this job, other than the fact that my best friend had been there for over the year and suggested it as a good place to work over the summer.

It was a packaging plant, and besides how oddly shaped some car parts can be, the days when parts didn't come in, and how I smashed my finger with the tape machine one time, there wasn't much to discuss about the job itself. The people who worked there were a different story. I kid you not that when I was moved to a different plant, one of the conversations chains within the group I worked with somehow contained how gambling in Vegas isn't what it's worked up to be, how spirituality is important, the Holocaust, the attack on Pearl Harbor, having a vacation at a haunted house, and how it is morally okay not to be a vegetarian. And there was a new combination like that almost every day (until I was moved to a different group).

My friend I mentioned earlier also has his share of stories to tell there, such as an employee who had such a loud voice they could be heard from across the building, even over the noisy machines, to someone who left their post for three hours to make a sandwich, and someone who came in drunk while also obviously on drugs and was fired on the spot. They also mentioned that a surprising amount of people couldn't count to five or ten. Guess that's what happens when a company has an "always hiring" policy,

Needless to say, I was glad to have the experience of working there. Not only did I earn some cash and work experience over the summer, I also got renewed encouragement to do well in college so I could get a job I enjoyed and not have to work in a place like that my whole life.

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44 minutes ago, Hawkwing said:

It was a packaging plant, and besides how oddly shaped some car parts can be, the days when parts didn't come in, and how I smashed my finger with the tape machine one time, there wasn't much to discuss about the job itself. The people who worked there were a different story. I kid you not that when I was moved to a different plant, one of the conversations chains within the group I worked with somehow contained how gambling in Vegas isn't what it's worked up to be, how spirituality is important, the Holocaust, the attack on Pearl Harbor, having a vacation at a haunted house, and how it is morally okay not to be a vegetarian. And there was a new combination like that almost every day (until I was moved to a different group).

My friend I mentioned earlier also has his share of stories to tell there, such as an employee who had such a loud voice they could be heard from across the building, even over the noisy machines, to someone who left their post for three hours to make a sandwich, and someone who came in drunk while also obviously on drugs and was fired on the spot. They also mentioned that a surprising amount of people couldn't count to five or ten. Guess that's what happens when a company has an "always hiring" policy,

The monotonous jobs are the jobs where you hear most varied and interesting conversations.  Lots to think about while you're basically pushing the assembly line along, so to speak.  Sort of like if you work at a bar, except with less people stumbling around in a drunken slog.

At the same time, I definitely don't envy those working such jobs.  I know of lots of people who are... I guess I'd say the best word to describe them is "draining" due to the existential dread they have from working these kinds of jobs.  Some are content to work those kinds of jobs while others hate the very idea, but I hear enough existential dread as it is from my former classmates on social media, I don't need to hear it right in my ear 6-8 hours a day, 4-7 days a week from someone I went to school with.

1 minute ago, Azure in a Roundabout said:

How were you able to find your client in what could be slightly crowded places?

1: I live in Montana, the least populated state in the United States of America.  Granted, it's one of the cities with a significant portion of that population, but it's not like going to a store in, say, Brooklyn or Seattle.

2: The places I went to were a small thrift store and an even smaller pizza joint, not very many places to look in them; in fact, it's more difficult to find the stores themselves than it is to find the client in the stores.

3: Always would work around either 11 AM - 3 PM or 6 PM - 10 PM.  Not very many people going to shops during lunch time, and not many people working in the late evening.

4: Ask for names, they always list the names.

5: They'll usually see you with a bag that contains their food (I would always use an insulated bag [strongly recommended for those who do food delivery] apart from the bags the food places give me, but they probably can tell) and approach you.

6: They always leave instructions.

7: They can call or text me, and I can do the same to them.

 

All things considered, it's not very difficult to find the customer.  It's more difficult to locate the place you're supposed to deliver to if you aren't adjusted to doing delivery in the first place.

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8 hours ago, Vince777 said:

I just want to know what the fuck Ice Dragon's job is that allows him to spend thousands every month on FEH. 

I want that story. 

He works as a programmer. He's mentioned that his company was at one point (don't know if it's to this day) associated with a hospital. Something to do with patient information stored in secure databases or something like that.

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37 minutes ago, redlight said:

He works as a programmer. He's mentioned that his company was at one point (don't know if it's to this day) associated with a hospital. Something to do with patient information stored in secure databases or something like that.

I knew it was something in the medical field.

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11 hours ago, Vince777 said:

I just want to know what the fuck Ice Dragon's job is that allows him to spend thousands every month on FEH. 

I want that story. 

5 hours ago, Azure in a Roundabout said:

I myself am also curious about @Ice Dragon.

Software developer for electronic medical records software. I specifically work on our online patient scheduling functionality, so there's a chance some people here may have used it before if you've ever scheduled a doctor's appointment online (actually scheduled, not just sent a message requesting an appointment time).

I live in the suburban outskirts of Madison, Wisconsin, where it's about 15 minutes to downtown and 15 minutes to the middle of cornfields, and rent and utilities for a 900-square-foot apartment costs me about $1,200, which I believe is lower than a high-rise studio apartment in Chicago. Work is less than 15 minutes away, so I only need to fill up on gas once a month if I don't travel.

"Thousands" is probably an overstatement for my Heroes spending, as my spending on Heroes is only a bit higher than my rent these days.

Nothing terribly special.

Edited by Ice Dragon

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When you don't spend much on expenses, it's surprising how much money you can save up.  Especially travel and home expenses.

If you're good with budgeting, you'll also be able to save money in the long run.  Especially if you can keep up with your debts or even sacrifice some frivolities to bring those debts down further.

Also helps to not have a crap job.  The tech industry is a flourishing one, so it's not surprising some find themselves making a decent amount of money working in it.  I myself plan to attend a coding academy later this year in pursuit of a job doing programming, via the recommendation of a close friend who's also into coding.

 

The only question I have is how anyone can regularly put $1,000+ into a game and still not have everything the game has to offer.  Like, I understand the game regularly updates, but I mean... well, it's just insane.  I think I just don't understand how gachas work.

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I use to work at a coffee shop in a bad section of the city and we'd get more rude customers. I specifically remember this older guy coming in to complain how his previous order was bad and he wanted order remade. So I ring him up and tell him the price. He looks at me like I owed him money instead and wanted the coffee for free. I was new and didn't want to deal with him so I just made the coffee and gave it to him. Would have let my manager handle it if but she's usually not there during my shift. On top of that, he wants it hot so he would lean over the counter to see if I'm going to make a fresh pot. This wouldn't be so bad if he didn't pull the same dumb stunt multiple times and it would always be me being the one to have to take his order. 

This is more of a general thing but some times when customers came in, they somehow expect me to know the type of coffee(hot or iced) they wanted. It's annoying when I try to confirm and they say "yes" with the tone of "duh" and I'm like I'm supposed to read your mind?

I just never understood entitled people. Thankfully I don't work that part-time job anymore.

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So at the law office I work at, a large part of what I do is act as point-of-first contact for prospective clients. 

People call into the office. The secretary picks up the phone. They say I wanna talk to a lawyer. I think my rights have been violated. The secretary says Okay. I'm going to put you through to our associate. And then they speak to me.  

My job (part of my job) is to talk to these people. Ask them questions. Collect as much information as I can in about a half hour. Try to construct a picture of whats happening to them, what the timeline looks like, and who's doing it.

Then go to my boss and tell him either This person called in. It sounds like a whole load of nothing. I don't think there's anything there. Or this person called in. It sounds like a real civil rights violation. I think there's a case here--lets bring this person in for a consult, review their documents, and try to get them signed up if the story checks out.

(this is where I have to be super analytical about trying to sort out reliable information from irrelevant tangents and false claims--if the firm winds up taking on crazy clients and sinking time + $$$ into "cases" that aren't really cases, its because I fucked up and I didn't do my job)
 
And 9-times-out-of-10, its nothing. Very, very few people who call into our office actually have real civil rights claims.

But I like to think I'm pretty good at identifying the ones who do.

And--oh my god--some of the people who call in thinking they're being "harassed" or "discriminated against" are fucking crazy.

You wouldn't believe some of the stories I hear :o:
________

I got a call from a woman in a mental hospital who told me she needed a lawyer because she was committed against her will and the doctors were "abusing" her. I asked her what they were doing to her. She told me they were "reading her mind" and "putting thoughts" in her head. 

I got a call from a guy who was having quid-pro-quo sex with female subordinates + called one of his female coworkers a bitch at a work event. His supervisors got multiple complaints about his behavior, did an investigation, and he admitted to everything. They fired him. He called me thinking he had a case for wrongful termination, by reason of gender discrimination based on his status as a male.   

 

Edited by Shoblongoo

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@Shoblongoo I want to hear one. Just one. Especially if you have a good one of someone under 18 thinking they have been. (at the hands of someone over 18). I'm sure you have plenty of those right?

That wrongful termination made my brain explode. He confessed and THEN tried to get see if he had a case?!

Edited by Tediz64
added new content

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21 minutes ago, Tediz64 said:

Especially if you have a good one of someone under 18 thinking they have been. (at the hands of someone over 18). 

...I don't have any of those...

I have ALOT of the opposite, actually.  Older folk thinking they're being discriminated against by younger coworkers. (some of them are actually pretty legit)

Most of it is just strictly "You've been doing this job for 20 years and its costing me $150,000 to keep you here. I can hire two (2) graduate students to do your job, and they'll each work for $40,000. You're fired." 

And that's dickish--but that isn't illegal. An employer is entirely within their rights to fire you for the non-discriminatory, bone-fide business reason of believing someone else can do your job and do it cheaper.

But every now and then you get a "I took time off for hip replacement surgery. When I came back to work they told me  HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY!!! WOW! YOU'RE GETTING OLD! YOU SENILE OLD MAN!? A week later they fired me and hired a 35 year old."

Or "I turned 50, and my boss started making comments about my physical appearance. He said he never would have hired me if he knew I was that old. He likes to only hire women he finds sexually attractive. He started constantly making jokes about my wrinkles and breasts sagging. He hired this girl fresh out of college--she didn't know ANYTHING--he told me he hired her because she had 'great tits.' He made me train her and teach her how to do my job. Then he gave her my position and fired me." 

...those are the fact-patterns that make you go Okay. There's a case here.

Edited by Shoblongoo

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43 minutes ago, Shoblongoo said:

Or "I turned 50, and my boss started making comments about my physical appearance. He said he never would have hired me if he knew I was that old. He likes to only hire women he finds sexually attractive. He started constantly making jokes about my wrinkles and breasts sagging. He hired this girl fresh out of college--she didn't know ANYTHING--he told me he hired her because she had 'great tits.' He made me train her and teach her how to do my job. Then he gave her my position and fired me." 

This one is pretty extreme. I wonder how often it happens. So if you have a case, and your client wins, what kind of punishment are those people looking at?

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50 minutes ago, Shoblongoo said:

I got a call from a guy who was having quid-pro-quo sex with female subordinates + called one of his female workers a bitch at a work event. His supervisors got multiple complaints about his behavior, did an investigation, and he admitted to everything. They fired him. He called me thinking he had a case for wrongful termination, by reason of gender discrimination based on his status as a male.  

Un-goddamn-real.  Pretty much the equivalent of bragging about having sex with a drunk girl and then claiming that she was the one who raped you.  Or all the morons who say sexual harassment is just "guys being guys".  Fool, I'm a guy and I never once touched a girl in a way that made her uncomfortable, so you f*** right off with that garbage.

26 minutes ago, Shoblongoo said:

"I turned 50, and my boss started making comments about my physical appearance. He said he never would have hired me if he knew I was that old. He likes to only hire women he finds sexually attractive. He started constantly making jokes about my wrinkles and breasts sagging. He hired this girl fresh out of college--she didn't know ANYTHING--he told me he hired her because she had 'great tits.' He made me train her and teach her how to do my job. Then he gave her my position and fired me." 

Sounds like a great boss.  Judging employees based on how much he wants to have sex with them, that's definitely a good quality to base your hiring judgment by.  Not how good they actually are at the job, just how easy it is to crush your neck in their chests.

Like, what the hell do they want?  A functioning business or a goddamn anime prince's harem?  Maybe all these dickhead employers wouldn't have to be such penny pinching scrooges if they thought with their brains instead of the junk downstairs.  Then again, their brains are probably wired to think women who aren't sexually appealing are useless, so maybe they should just not be the ones making decisions in any area except in regards to which seats they wants to take in the mess hall of a prison.  I know, it's a pipe dream to imagine these scumbags actually going to prison, but they have to pay some price for being the worthless scum they are.

You're doing good work there, though.  Anyone who helps make the process of proper justice easier and better deserves props.

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