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Post a random fact people probably don't know! (And even if they did, they wouldn't care.)

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4 minutes ago, Interdimensional Observer said:

Unless you're a Muslim woman in India stuck somewhere, probably rural, where there is no "enlightened" safe zone of religious tolerance nor gender/sexual freedom. Then you're persecuted by your government, and denied a say within your religio-societal group due to a harsh male monopoly on power.

Well, I never said it was fair or good.

4 minutes ago, Interdimensional Observer said:

No, India was in the Scouring

I now accept this as canon.

It perfectly explains where Great Tiger obtained his powerful magic and glowing turban stone- the stone from dragonkind and the turban from Alec.

4 minutes ago, Interdimensional Observer said:

And before you say "Jahn would never waste his time and effort on an extravagant tomb for a wife", you would be right.

In spite of it not actually being a tomb, does this mean Aurangzeb was a half-manakete son of Jahn from Fire Emblem 6?

***

Aurangzeb, despite his reputation as an oppressive Islamic fundamentalist (which has been argued to be an oversimplification of a more complex piety), employed the largest amount (I forget if it's by total or percentage) of Hindus in the state bureaucracy of any Mughal emperor.

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33 minutes ago, AnonymousSpeed said:

In spite of it not actually being a tomb, does this mean Aurangzeb was a half-manakete son of Jahn from Fire Emblem 6?

How else is one to explain the hubris towards conquering the Deccan Plateau? Aurangzeb's folly stems from expecting too much of his purely human countrymen, and from acting as though his draconic nature was more than half. Dragons yearn to survive, not to have pride and ambition, if he was truly dragon, Aurangzeb would've recognized the Deccan as not a true threat to his realm, and therein preserved his empire far better than it was to be with such fruitless territorial gain.

 

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Kevlar- poly-paraphenylene terephthalamide is the scientific name- was invented in 1965 by Stephanie Louise Kwolek.

She was born in 1923 in the state of Pennsylvania, to parents who were Polish immigrants. Her mother was a seamstress, her father a naturalist. Kwolek wanted to become a fashion designer, but her mother warned her she would starve with the income of that profession. So, she got a degree in chemistry and became a chemist at DuPont in 1946. Her research focused on new polymers, created by cooling and condensing substances. Discovering liquid crystal polymers, she realized they could be spun together to create extremely strong and fire- and corrosion-resistant threads.

By the time she died in 2014, she owned 17 patents from her decades of research. But how peculiar it is that her most remembered discovery/invention is the one that combined the love of the natural world she gained from her father, with a measure of the love for clothing that she developed from her mother.

Edited by Interdimensional Observer

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3 hours ago, Interdimensional Observer said:

By the time she died in 2014, she owned 17 patents from her decades of research. But how peculiar it is that her most remembered discovery/invention is the one that combined the love of the natural world she gained from her father, with a measure of the love for clothing that she developed from her mother.

A fascinating narrative thread.

3 hours ago, Interdimensional Observer said:

How else is one to explain the hubris towards conquering the Deccan Plateau? Aurangzeb's folly stems from expecting too much of his purely human countrymen, and from acting as though his draconic nature was more than half. Dragons yearn to survive, not to have pride and ambition, if he was truly dragon, Aurangzeb would've recognized the Deccan as not a true threat to his realm, and therein preserved his empire far better than it was to be with such fruitless territorial gain.

Don't you be dissin' my boy Aurangzeb now. Survival with no ambition is like eating without taste, but worse, probably.

***

Marie Curie is canonically taller than Mega Man.

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Daemon X Machnina has free DLC to add Geralt and Ciri from the Witcher to the game.

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Speaking of art, Picasso's style of painting sucks.

Opinions aside, art is almost as old as humanity itself.

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Although many consider them thieves or exploiters of an easy way to make money. Big Nightcore channels on youtube are actually song promoters and consider themselves such.

(And if we're on the topic of art, does all music count as art?)

 

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Back during the Middle Ages, rulers liked to link their ancestry to the heroes in the books read in court, whether they were fictional or otherwise.

9 minutes ago, Bastionb56 said:

(And if we're on the topic of art, does all music count as art?)

Music, painting, and literature are the three things that are "accepted" as art.
But not all music, painting and literature is art, because apparently, some elitists that consider themselves way too important can just arbitrarily decide that based on basically nothing.

I should know, I study literature. And let me tell you: that stuff they forced on you in school, saying that was "fine art"? Yeah, just randomly picked out from thousands upon thousands of books by no other metric than some random people saying "yeah, this belongs in a "canon" now". Ugh.
The underlying problem here is the age-old argument killer that "beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder" in addition to "taste is subjective". Worst part of that so-called "elite" that would like to tell you otherwise? They're both true.

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Both Raindrops and Planets are very frequent occurences in our daily life, however their strategy for having such high presence is very different.

(I'll go with, people know, but don't really think about it for this one)

--

I can't imagine what studying literature would be like, considering the subjectiveness of meaning when it comes to almost everything in literature. Also yeah in school no one told us it's fine art, everyone knew how random it was (including the teachers)

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This following fact will double as a reply to the post above me:
Good professors will tell you that so long as you can show that your interpretation of a work or text has a solid foundation within the text, nobody can say that your interpretation is wrong. "Right or wrong" are pretty much nonexistent in literary studies, unless it concerns facts, such as a time in which a text was written or the life of the author.

Though analyzing texts isn't all there is to it in literary studies. It is a pretty large field, actually, that goes from the historical context in which a work was written to analyzing the technique used to even looking at how texts were produced and received in times long past. And that's only scratching the surface, really.

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(Oh my god I wish I had your professors, I'd probably love literature if it was thought in this way!)

Many teachers in highschool task you with analyzing a literary work, but the grading is not only based on if the analysis makes sense and is written the correct way, instead teachers grade you on how close you were to the "True Meaning" of the text you where given, if you "misenterpreted" the text, your chance of a good score goes down signifantly, even if your analysis is perfectly fine otherwise and is a perfectly acceptable interpretation of the text

(Yeah this doubles as fact and response)

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Elephants, on average, have longer noses than humans.

19 minutes ago, Bastionb56 said:

Many teachers in highschool task you with analyzing a literary work, but the grading is not only based on if the analysis makes sense and is written the correct way, instead teachers grade you on how close you were to the "True Meaning" of the text you where given, if you "misenterpreted" the text, your chance of a good score goes down signifantly, even if your analysis is perfectly fine otherwise and is a perfectly acceptable interpretation of the text

I had those teachers, too. They sucked.

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5 hours ago, DragonFlames said:

Music, painting, and literature are the three things that are "accepted" as art.

While almost everyone will agree with this statement, videogames, which combine all three of these things into an interactive medium, are considered not to be art by many of theses same people, often sparking debate in the process.

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51 minutes ago, Bastionb56 said:

Many teachers in highschool task you with analyzing a literary work, but the grading is not only based on if the analysis makes sense and is written the correct way, instead teachers grade you on how close you were to the "True Meaning" of the text you where given, if you "misenterpreted" the text, your chance of a good score goes down signifantly, even if your analysis is perfectly fine otherwise and is a perfectly acceptable interpretation of the text

Big part of why I have such ambivalence towards Shakespeare these days and reluctant to approach anything he wrote.  Sorry but if you're going to spend a whole hour talking about why Rosaline's name was Rosaline and how it supposedly links to a big part of the underlying message of everything happening in the story and how all of the events are this giant Da Vinci Code-esque puzzle that needs to be solved and interpreted properly to begin to appreciate on any level, I can't get behind it anymore.

TL;DR? Basically replace "What the author meant." with "What I got out of it."

The Colour of the Curtains | The Bubble

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On 3/29/2020 at 4:05 PM, DragonFlames said:

This is the first time in a long while I consciously see @Hawkwing post on these Forums.

Blame juggling 12 videogames simultaneously for that.

 

Despite having unlimited ammo, the Chigaco Typewriter has a reload animation in Resident Evil 4, including an easter egg if you do it while wearing the second unlockable costume.

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Video games can be art, not everything, but there are clear instances of it. Kojima was wrong, interactivity does not inherently destroy the artistic nature of video games. And art's definition deserves to expand as human advances, nobody criticizes the inclusion of cinema to the arts in the 20th century.

Also, my interpretation of Hamlet- procrastinate and everybody dies. Either resolve to do your duty or don't do it all, things will end most miserably if you get stuck in-between.

 

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Single-malt Scotch whisky does not taste better if aged 50 years in a barrel (ideally charred American oak used once beforehand for bourbon). The fine characteristics reaches peak maturity in 18 years tops, going longer potentially diminishes the good traits and leaves behind a more bitter drink.

If one purchases Scotch aged beyond this, you aren't paying for price, you're paying merely for scarcity, since most of a distillation's volume will have already been sold, and "the angels' take"- evaporation- will have reduced the remaining amount of whisky even further. Really old single-malt Scotch is therefore more of a status symbol of whom you desire to associate yourself with, and a sign that in general you have excess money to spend on consumption as you wish.

Edited by Interdimensional Observer

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The Hylian Shield from The Legend of Zelda series is stronger than Nayru's Love and Palutena's Reflection Barrier.

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Disney's classic animated movie The Lion King was accused of being a rip-off of an old anime series known as Kimba the White Lion.
Bonus fact: The story of The Lion King is based on Shakespeare's Hamlet.

On 3/31/2020 at 5:19 PM, Emperor_Siegfried said:

Big part of why I have such ambivalence towards Shakespeare these days and reluctant to approach anything he wrote.  Sorry but if you're going to spend a whole hour talking about why Rosaline's name was Rosaline and how it supposedly links to a big part of the underlying message of everything happening in the story and how all of the events are this giant Da Vinci Code-esque puzzle that needs to be solved and interpreted properly to begin to appreciate on any level, I can't get behind it anymore.

I probably shouldn't be saying this as someone who studies literature, but I'm 100% convinced some people only say these things in order to elevate themselves, like "this author had this intention and only I can see it".

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Straight Facts: Poor criticism =/= poor art. Art criticism is something a maximum of four modern men do well, but that does nothing to change that the classics are classics for a reason.

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Another straight fact: Criticism of art/literature/film/games is always painted by the critics' personal views, beliefs, preferences, and standards. Biases, if you will. There is no 100% objectivity to be found there despite the many, many people who would like to pretend the opposite case is true.

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You also can't pretend like there is no objectivity in criticism, though. Preferences have their place, but people are observing the same work. Factors like structure, color composition, the sense of motion, tone, metaphor, these are things that can be pinpointed and examined quite specifically. Their effectiveness can be assessed based on how it uses these factors. A competent critic builds a case on things that even those who disagree with them should be able to understand, or at least see demonstrated. Also subjectivity doesn't exist.

***

A bonus fact: John Adams had a dog named Satan.

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The painter Bob Ross made at least 403 paintings over the course of 31 seasons of his TV Show The Joy of Painting.

7 hours ago, AnonymousSpeed said:

You also can't pretend like there is no objectivity in criticism, though. Preferences have their place, but people are observing the same work. Factors like structure, color composition, the sense of motion, tone, metaphor, these are things that can be pinpointed and examined quite specifically. Their effectiveness can be assessed based on how it uses these factors. A competent critic builds a case on things that even those who disagree with them should be able to understand, or at least see demonstrated.

This is true, too.

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Shooting the lock off of a door is a bad idea, as using a high powered gun would only create a lot of shrapnel while a less powerful one might have the bullet get buried harmlessly inside the lock.

SWAT teams and soldiers breach doors either with a small battering ram or a shotgun, and said shotgun is aimed at the doors hinges/sides instead of the lock.

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