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Hey guys, tired of the constant Edelgard, Rhea, Dimitri, Claude arguments about X and Y? Good, so am I. 

So let's talk about something that I think is WAY more fun, or rather, present a theory of mine that I started to make about Fodlan that ISN'T about the story and who's right and wrong.

Namely, in regards to magic.

How does magic in Fódlan work? 

Unlike most FE games, where magic is from tomes and staves, Fódlan forgoes the use of such things, and can cast them on their own. So does magic in Fodlan simply work differently? 

In a Fire Emblem interview, Kaga actually explains exactly how magic works in Archanea, and it's very interesting.

Quote

Q3: What is magic in the world of Fire Emblem?

Comment: Originally primitive deities existed at Akaneia and people believed these deities existed in all things. To lead mankind, Gotoh utilised the power of these deities. Magic (both offensive and recovery) is about as advanced as the dragon race’s technology, but it was difficult and dangerous for humans to use. Gotoh convinced humans to borrow the deities’ powers and warned them at the same time.

So fire magic comes from the deity of fire, wind magic is borrowed from the deity of wind and etc.

Magic is thus the technology where one harnesses energy that exists naturally. Spell books and staves can be thought of as vessels that store this energy. To release this energy requires a certain amount of skill, such as by chanting keywords or through mental control techniques. In order to acquire a sufficient skill level, one must undergo self-training. Prayers to the deities seems to reveal the keywords, while it also raises one’s mental capacity.

Meanwhile, to protect the most powerful spells, like Aura or Excalibur, Gotoh attached a contract to them so that only the user could wield them. The same kind of protection was also placed on the Falchion.

Now, the part where I bolded is where I think holds the key to the question. 

I believe that the principles of magic in Fódlan works the same way as it does in Archanea, but simply done differently. Or perhaps is more advanced than Arcahnea's. 

In every FE game, magic at times tends to always form glyphs and magic circles at times when being used. With tomes and staves, the energy is stored inside them, and thus the chants and such releases the magic. And the energy is overall diminished from its storage, hence how tomes and staves "break" in games. I won't go into how Fates doesn't do that, cause that's something different I can explain another way.

But there's also Gaiden/Echoes, which actually has similar functions to 3H's magic, which does not use tomes or staves. Instead, use of magic consumes HP, which I theorize is harnessing the energy within one's own body rather than the natural energy that surrounds them.

I think Fódlan's magic is a more step up from that. 

I want to point people to an aesthetic that has always appeared in Fire Emblem. Whenever mages cast spells, there's generally a a circle of glyphs and symbols that surround them, or appear as magic circles in front of or underneath them. 

My belief is that these glyphs represent are the very thing that is storing the energy of the magic and you are now releasing that energy. 

So these glyphs and symbols also appear in Three Houses, and actually seem a lot more intricate and complex when you look at them. 

With that, I wish to point to something in Annette and Sylvain's support that caught my eye:

Quote

Annette: If I use the formula in this line here, the magical energy should... No, that's not right...

Sylvain: You're even cuter when you're working through a difficult problem.

Annette: Sylvain, I'm serious! Please be quiet.

Sylvain: Hang on. Look at the third line. You've got the formula wrong.

Annette: I said be... Oh. You're right. How did you know that?

Sylvain: Well, I mean, it's written right there...

Annette: Most people wouldn't be able to grasp this formula just by glancing at it. Have you read this book before?

Sylvain: Nope, this is the first time. OK, now that I look at it... Wow. This book makes things way more complicated than they need to be.

Annette: Hmm... And what's your take on this part here?

Sylvain: It's just describing another application for the same formula. Ha! This is pretty easy!

 What's interesting here is how Annette and Sylvain are talking about magic "formulas" which is very interesting. 

If you watch how whenever people try to explain magic, they try to "explain" it by making the magic be something that is similar to things like computer programs and such, like they do in the Dr. Strange movie. Well, this is the similar case. A formula basically means that the the symbols and characters are formed to allow the spell to do what it is meant to do. 

Now things start to become a bit clearer.

Basically, Fódlan's magic is based on memorizing and utilizing magical formulas that for what tomes and staves do. It's more intricate and difficult overall because it's more advanced. This is because Fódlan's magical formulas has you immediately have the natural energy be drawn into the magical seal, and then immediately discharged, without the need tomes to act as the storage. 

However, I also theorize that the drawback is that magic formulas act as a way of limited use, because of the intricate design of the formulas. So that is why units cannot use spells only a limited amount of times per battle, unlike tomes, which can store a lot more energy. And only more advanced classes are able to attain abilities to use spells more, since the class is meant to represent that you have attained a level of knowledge that lets you adjust the formulas that allow you to use a bit more often. And Crests that let you save spell from being consumed is basically the Crests providing the energy for the magic formula that basically acts as a variable that can avoid disrupting the formula. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And that has been my theory on how magic in Fódlan works. Do you have any ideas on how it could work? 

Obviously I may very well be overthinking this, but it's interesting to consider how things work at times, and at least this is one of those discussions about 3H that won't have to get into the the typical kinds of arguments, so it should be more enjoyable.

Hope to have a discussion that could be momentarily enjoyable if anyone is interested.

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Casting magic through the use of formulas? Reminds me of Final Fantasy's Arithmeticians.

I would say, "Well, no wonder it is referred to as Reason"; but then those spells under the Faith category still use formulas, no?

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2 minutes ago, Acacia Sgt said:

Casting magic through the use of formulas? Reminds me of Final Fantasy's Arithmeticians.

I would say, "Well, no wonder it is referred to as Reason"; but then those spells under the Faith category still use formulas, no?

Well, there is this remark made by Kaga about magic that would apply to Faith Magic:

Quote

Prayers to the deities seems to reveal the keywords, while it also raises one’s mental capacity.

So even Faith Magic would have forms where formulas can be formed. 

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There probably isn't enough in the game to actually draw any sort of definite conclusion, but it's still fun to speculate about even so. I don't really give much credence to comparisons with older games in the series. This is a completely different setting with no links  in terms of lore and story, and is also worked on by different people. I just don't see any reason to suppose that things should work the same way.

For me, the first place I look when trying to figure out magic in Fódlan is the split between reason and faith magic. Faith magic does seem to draw on the power of the goddess and the connection of the caster to the goddess. If you look at the characters who have a weakness in faith, they're foreigners (Claude, Petra, Dedue, Cyril, Shamir), those who are bitter and resentful towards the goddess (Edelgard, Hubert, Dorothea, Jeritza) and -- for some reason unknown to me -- Hilda.

Spoiler

I can't remember the exact details or wording, but I believe that at some point once Dorothea unlocks her budding talent in faith and requests to have it as her goals, she indicates that she never really had faith in the goddess, but does have faith in Byleth. Except that what she didn't know is that Byleth pretty much is the goddess, so that is still faith in the goddess, somewhat indirectly.

So while it is clear that there is some sort of divine connection to white magic, it isn't clear to me if that connection is all that there is to white magic or only a component. The Agarthans do field white magic users but that could easily be that they are using their technology to mirror the same sort of effects through an entirely different means. I was trying to think if there are any examples of cultures outside of Fódlan who use white magic, and I can't think of any. The Almyran forces present in Dividing the World (Hilda and Cyril's paralogue) don't have any white magic users with them, but it's hard to say whether that's because they aren't capable of white magic, their warrior culture disdains magic in general, or just that there weren't any present in that particular deployment.

What is clear is that an individual who has no natural aptitude for analytic reasoning and no training in it can still cast faith magic at a high level (Manuela, for instance). To me, that indicates that anything that faith and reason spells have in common, such as fancy glyphs and glowy animations, cannot be something unique to the reason magic process. Instead, it seems to be something inherent to the raw stuff of magic itself, whatever that may be.

If I had to speculate, I would say that there is some basic underlying stuff of magic, and that faith and reason are different ways of drawing upon that power. The way I'm imagining things is that it's relatively easy for someone with strong magical ability (in game terms, a high magic stat) to create very small effects, like a tiny spark, or a gentle puff of air, or changing the colour of a small object, or something like that. The challenge with magic is to build that small effect up into something bigger, which is where all the complex reasoning and formulae come in. I base that on the idea of the various resonant magic gambits, where a full battalion are pooling their magic efforts to create a single large effect, by creating a resonance. Essentially, the individual members of the battalion are trained not to channel their magic into a spell output like "fire" or "heal" but to keep it in a more primal form that feeds the resonance that then unleashes the single gambit, which is effectively a spell on a larger scale than any individual can achieve. I am imagining that an individual casting black magic spells is essentially doing the same thing on a smaller scale, using formulae and resonances to construct the fine strands of primal magic into a specific manifestation. On the other hand, I would imagine that for white magic, the user still has to summon the raw threads of magic, but that it is the goddess (or some manifestation of the divine) who then shapes those threads into a spell.

Is all of this entirely backed up by what we see in the game? Not really, no. I think it's consistent with the game, and there are bits of it that are supported in part, but it is largely just my person interpretation of things that aren't ever well explained.

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7 minutes ago, lenticular said:

For me, the first place I look when trying to figure out magic in Fódlan is the split between reason and faith magic. Faith magic does seem to draw on the power of the goddess and the connection of the caster to the goddess. If you look at the characters who have a weakness in faith, they're foreigners (Claude, Petra, Dedue, Cyril, Shamir), those who are bitter and resentful towards the goddess (Edelgard, Hubert, Dorothea, Jeritza) and -- for some reason unknown to me -- Hilda.

Yup. I like how you are on Reason and Faith actually tells a lot. 

8 minutes ago, lenticular said:

So while it is clear that there is some sort of divine connection to white magic, it isn't clear to me if that connection is all that there is to white magic or only a component. The Agarthans do field white magic users but that could easily be that they are using their technology to mirror the same sort of effects through an entirely different means. I was trying to think if there are any examples of cultures outside of Fódlan who use white magic, and I can't think of any. The Almyran forces present in Dividing the World (Hilda and Cyril's paralogue) don't have any white magic users with them, but it's hard to say whether that's because they aren't capable of white magic, their warrior culture disdains magic in general, or just that there weren't any present in that particular deployment.

Perhaps not. If you read the shadow library, the Agarthans actually do seem to have their own forms of belief and faith, as Thinis was the land of old "gods", and they refer to Sothis as a False God. So likely before Sothis arrived and created the Nabateans, the Agarthans had their own religion.

But Faith Magic where you pray to the goddess may simply commune with spirits of light or such, and resonate with the prayers, thus drawing their energy in as a result. Cause remember, you cannot actually SEE these spirits, as they are invisible to the eye. 

Hence why in games like FE7, we have characters like Nino, who can actually talk to spirits, and those spirits actually make her be extremely adept at magic as shown in her supports with Erk. 

14 minutes ago, lenticular said:

If I had to speculate, I would say that there is some basic underlying stuff of magic, and that faith and reason are different ways of drawing upon that power. The way I'm imagining things is that it's relatively easy for someone with strong magical ability (in game terms, a high magic stat) to create very small effects, like a tiny spark, or a gentle puff of air, or changing the colour of a small object, or something like that. The challenge with magic is to build that small effect up into something bigger, which is where all the complex reasoning and formulae come in. I base that on the idea of the various resonant magic gambits, where a full battalion are pooling their magic efforts to create a single large effect, by creating a resonance. Essentially, the individual members of the battalion are trained not to channel their magic into a spell output like "fire" or "heal" but to keep it in a more primal form that feeds the resonance that then unleashes the single gambit, which is effectively a spell on a larger scale than any individual can achieve. I am imagining that an individual casting black magic spells is essentially doing the same thing on a smaller scale, using formulae and resonances to construct the fine strands of primal magic into a specific manifestation. On the other hand, I would imagine that for white magic, the user still has to summon the raw threads of magic, but that it is the goddess (or some manifestation of the divine) who then shapes those threads into a spell.

Consider it like this in a more simplistic way with spirits.

Reason is basically knowing and telling the spirits what to do, basically commanding them to act in the way. So it has to make sense, or it won't work. Like if you want fire, you basically getting the air to heat up and combust into flames, before converging into a sphere and becoming a fireball to fire at a foe. 

Faith works by asking and thus being given help. So you ask for this person to be healed, and the spirits comply and heal them. But harder spells aren't possible because you cannot communicate with the spirits that could give you the power for those spells. 

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I know most Fire Emblem games do use the "spirits that grant magic" thing and all... but does it apply for Fodlan too?

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1 minute ago, Acacia Sgt said:

I know most Fire Emblem games do use the "spirits that grant magic" thing and all... but does it apply for Fodlan too?

No one ever says.

But I go by the belief that all Fire Emblem magic functions the same way. Simply each side have different ways of using them and different levels of advancement. But the principles are likely follow the same type of laws.

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30 minutes ago, Acacia Sgt said:

I know most Fire Emblem games do use the "spirits that grant magic" thing and all... but does it apply for Fodlan too?

Claude does put forward more of an animistic world-view in some of his supports. I want to say it's in his supports with Leonie and Petra, but I don't remember exactly so I might be wrong there. But even then, it's presented more as the beliefs of one individual rather than a definitive "this is how the world is" sort of thing.

28 minutes ago, omegaxis1 said:

No one ever says.

But I go by the belief that all Fire Emblem magic functions the same way. Simply each side have different ways of using them and different levels of advancement. But the principles are likely follow the same type of laws.

I generally tend towards thinking that different Fire Emblem settings are completely different worlds with entirely unrelated lore and entirely unrelated metaphysics and natural laws. I mean, there's nothing I can point to that says that you're wrong to think of it the way you do, and I wouldn't ever want to try to convince you otherwise, but arguments based on how things are in other games in the series don't hold weight with me personally.

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4 minutes ago, lenticular said:

Claude does put forward more of an animistic world-view in some of his supports. I want to say it's in his supports with Leonie and Petra, but I don't remember exactly so I might be wrong there. But even then, it's presented more as the beliefs of one individual rather than a definitive "this is how the world is" sort of thing.

I believe that Petra talks about how there's Cold Spirit and such, so other religions do believe a case of how spirits exists. 

4 minutes ago, lenticular said:

I generally tend towards thinking that different Fire Emblem settings are completely different worlds with entirely unrelated lore and entirely unrelated metaphysics and natural laws. I mean, there's nothing I can point to that says that you're wrong to think of it the way you do, and I wouldn't ever want to try to convince you otherwise, but arguments based on how things are in other games in the series don't hold weight with me personally.

Of course that may very well be the case, and not every world follows the same magical laws. But I like to believe that every world does, but people simply use things in different ways. I mean, it's not surprising if different cultures and beliefs may very well end up worshipping the exact same thing in the end without realizing.

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This is a very interesting, how would we define a spirit? Like a spirit of the dead person? Or just a powerful incorporal being? Maybe magic just manipulates life force of all living beings.

I have wondered earlier if the existence of faith magic confirms the existence of gods, but it could also be an in game mechanic and that in reality, white magic is also based on study and what is essentially an established science, just one attributed to the faith through church dogma. But it all connects to whenever Sothis is an actual goddess or not. I guess even if she isn't, maybe a dragon that is powerful enough can grant such powers, Sothis does definitely seem to have the extraordinary abilities like divine pulse. 

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5 hours ago, Darkmoon6789 said:

This is a very interesting, how would we define a spirit? Like a spirit of the dead person? Or just a powerful incorporal being? Maybe magic just manipulates life force of all living beings.

I have wondered earlier if the existence of faith magic confirms the existence of gods, but it could also be an in game mechanic and that in reality, white magic is also based on study and what is essentially an established science, just one attributed to the faith through church dogma. But it all connects to whenever Sothis is an actual goddess or not. I guess even if she isn't, maybe a dragon that is powerful enough can grant such powers, Sothis does definitely seem to have the extraordinary abilities like divine pulse. 

Ironically, he quesion of wheher Sothis is actually a goddess or not is probably only one that it even makes sense to ask in a monotheistic faith like the Church of Seiros. With polytheistic or animistic religions, the line between a god and a powerful spirit or a hero of legend is much more blurry and less significant. After Byleth's transformation, Petra likens them to such a figure from Brigid myths and legends, and I've no doubt that Sothis would also be considered as such on Brigid, and quite possibly Almyra as well. When a being is only one member of a pantheon, it doesn't matter so much if they fulfil every possible requirement for godhood. But with a monotheistic faith, a god or goddess must be above all others in every respect. In that tradition, Sothis might only be considered divine because she is believed to be the Beginning, the Progenitor God, etc. and if those parts of the tales about her were not true, then she might not be considered a god after all.

On further reflection, and considering everything we learn from Claude and Petra about the religions of their respective regions, I do think it's reasonable to assume that spirits do exist. It's plausible that their religions believe that spirits exist but they are completely wrong, btu that does seem like a bit of a stretch. In a world where time travel, magic, dragons, and the like are all definitely real, it would be very odd for religions to form up around something that doesn't exist. The question then is what role they play (if any) in magic? Can they grant magical abilities similar to the white magic of Fódlan? Is it possible that the only reason mages in Fódlan need to study reason and formulae is that they have lost touch with the spirits (due to the monotheistic nature of the Church of Seiros) and so aren't able to draw on their power as easily? I can't immediately think of any points in teh game that support or refute any of those possibilities.

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On the subject on whenever Sothis is or it isn’t a god, I suggest we don’t look at it as if gods are a sort of race, but rather if what they can do defines them as god. Considering Sothis can reverse time, create life, heal the land and travel between dimensions, I think it’s safe to assume she is a god.

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43 minutes ago, Water Mage said:

On the subject on whenever Sothis is or it isn’t a god, I suggest we don’t look at it as if gods are a sort of race, but rather if what they can do defines them as god. Considering Sothis can reverse time, create life, heal the land and travel between dimensions, I think it’s safe to assume she is a god.

Depends on how we define a god, Sothis is powerful, but not immortal, she can indeed be killed. Sometimes immortality would have been a criteria for being a god.

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58 minutes ago, Water Mage said:

On the subject on whenever Sothis is or it isn’t a god, I suggest we don’t look at it as if gods are a sort of race, but rather if what they can do defines them as god. Considering Sothis can reverse time, create life, heal the land and travel between dimensions, I think it’s safe to assume she is a god.

 

13 minutes ago, Darkmoon6789 said:

Depends on how we define a god, Sothis is powerful, but not immortal, she can indeed be killed. Sometimes immortality would have been a criteria for being a god.

I like how the discussion of magic turned into a discussion of gods.

Unexpected, but a welcome one. 

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1 hour ago, omegaxis1 said:

 

I like how the discussion of magic turned into a discussion of gods.

Unexpected, but a welcome one. 

Well, 50% of the magic in the game is supposedly from the gods. I just wonder if this is the case or not. Sothis is definitely an odd case, even if she is just a dragon. She is an absurdly powerful one. While I am only starting to gain familiarity with this entity, I can't but help connect her to Grima from awakening, a dragon called the God of Annihilation. Like how Sothis is the God of Creation. While I haven't played awakening yet, I did some research on Grima after getting Fell Vessel Robin in heroes. Seems to be somewhat of a history of dragons being viewed as gods in fire emblem. If I didn't know these games took place in completely different worlds. I would actually make the guess that the Agarthans worshipped something like Grima.

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2 hours ago, Darkmoon6789 said:

Well, 50% of the magic in the game is supposedly from the gods. I just wonder if this is the case or not. Sothis is definitely an odd case, even if she is just a dragon. She is an absurdly powerful one. While I am only starting to gain familiarity with this entity, I can't but help connect her to Grima from awakening, a dragon called the God of Annihilation. Like how Sothis is the God of Creation. While I haven't played awakening yet, I did some research on Grima after getting Fell Vessel Robin in heroes. Seems to be somewhat of a history of dragons being viewed as gods in fire emblem. If I didn't know these games took place in completely different worlds. I would actually make the guess that the Agarthans worshipped something like Grima.

It isn't unusual for dragons to be so powerful that they are worshipped as if they were gods. Naga in the Archanean games, especially Awakening, is worshipped as one, but Naga insists that she is no god, claiming not to have the power of making and unmaking. 

Thing is, even in the Tellius series, where we have a genuine goddess, said goddess lacked the ability to restore the dead to life. But in Echoes, Mila is a dragon that is inferior to Naga, but has the power to revive the dead. 

So there are gods and godlike beings, but they all have powers and abilities that are not omnipotent. 

I mean, even with Sothis's power of reversing time, she cannot actually change what is fated to happen, indicating how even gods cannot oppose fate. 

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25 minutes ago, omegaxis1 said:

It isn't unusual for dragons to be so powerful that they are worshipped as if they were gods. Naga in the Archanean games, especially Awakening, is worshipped as one, but Naga insists that she is no god, claiming not to have the power of making and unmaking. 

Thing is, even in the Tellius series, where we have a genuine goddess, said goddess lacked the ability to restore the dead to life. But in Echoes, Mila is a dragon that is inferior to Naga, but has the power to revive the dead. 

So there are gods and godlike beings, but they all have powers and abilities that are not omnipotent. 

I mean, even with Sothis's power of reversing time, she cannot actually change what is fated to happen, indicating how even gods cannot oppose fate. 

Humans have a tendency to worship anything more powerful than them as gods. Now that I think about it the gods in mythology do vary greatly in our, some aren't even immortal. I just realised that the gods in the Norse pantheon are actually destined to die in Ragnarok. So while the Asyr are mighty they are not invincible. 

So than is it possible that white magic is granted by beings like Sothis? But there might also be many other beings in the world capable of doing the same thing, apparently Brigid as an active shamanistic tradition, who probably has magic that works. Meaning, they probably can communicate with spirits of some kind. Kind of makes me wonder what the source for black and dark magic is. Granted black magic seems for the most part to be elemental magic. 

I am actually not certain why the characters who know dark magic in the game are the ones who knows this in particular. . It is usually associated with the Agarthans, how did Lysithea learn it? Maybe Hubert studied some of their spellbooks and I am almost 100% certain that the dark magic spells known by Edelgard is because Hubert taught her. Edelgard is actually the only character in the game with both black and dark magic to my knowledge.

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1 hour ago, Darkmoon6789 said:

Edelgard is actually the only character in the game with both black and dark magic to my knowledge.

Jeritza also has both types of magic (he learns Thunder, Thoron and Death).

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4 minutes ago, Stones said:

Jeritza also has both types of magic (he learns Thunder, Thoron and Death).

I must have somehow missed that, I wonder if he learnt death from Hubert, he does actually have that spell and the only other character who has two my knowledge is Thales

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5 hours ago, Darkmoon6789 said:

Humans have a tendency to worship anything more powerful than them as gods. Now that I think about it the gods in mythology do vary greatly in our, some aren't even immortal. I just realised that the gods in the Norse pantheon are actually destined to die in Ragnarok. So while the Asyr are mighty they are not invincible. 

In terms of real-world comparisons, I think that Ancient Egyptian religion is probably even more apt, given that that's where much of the real-world inspiration for Sothis comes from. Ancient Egypt had gods who could die (e.g. Osiris) as well as humans who became gods (e.g. Imhotep).

5 hours ago, Darkmoon6789 said:

I am actually not certain why the characters who know dark magic in the game are the ones who knows this in particular. . It is usually associated with the Agarthans, how did Lysithea learn it?

Spoiler

I've always assumed that she first learned dark magic while she was being subjected to the crest implantation experiments. Most likely the Agarthan experimenters needed her to be able to use some magic to test whether her Crest of Gloucester was working, so they taught her some of the basics, and naturally would choose dark magic over black or white since it was what they were most familiar wtih. It's also possible -- though I don't think as likely -- that she only saw the Agarthans using dark magic and was able to teach herself just from that; she is portrayed as being an extremely fast learner after all (with her personal skill, Mastermind).

 

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8 hours ago, lenticular said:

In terms of real-world comparisons, I think that Ancient Egyptian religion is probably even more apt, given that that's where much of the real-world inspiration for Sothis comes from. Ancient Egypt had gods who could die (e.g. Osiris) as well as humans who became gods (e.g. Imhotep).

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I've always assumed that she first learned dark magic while she was being subjected to the crest implantation experiments. Most likely the Agarthan experimenters needed her to be able to use some magic to test whether her Crest of Gloucester was working, so they taught her some of the basics, and naturally would choose dark magic over black or white since it was what they were most familiar wtih. It's also possible -- though I don't think as likely -- that she only saw the Agarthans using dark magic and was able to teach herself just from that; she is portrayed as being an extremely fast learner after all (with her personal skill, Mastermind).

 

All playable Dark Magic users have some relationship with TWSITD, Hapi, Edelgard and Lynstella, were experimented by them, Hubert and Jeuritza were their "allies" só they were allowed to learn some of it

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33 minutes ago, darkblade2814 said:

All playable Dark Magic users have some relationship with TWSITD, Hapi, Edelgard and Lynstella, were experimented by them, Hubert and Jeuritza were their "allies" só they were allowed to learn some of it

And the Dark Mage class is a class that comes from the Dark Seal, an item that only the Death Knight drops, who uses Agarthan tech, since those voice modulators and that scythe are both items from Agarthans.

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1 hour ago, omegaxis1 said:

And the Dark Mage class is a class that comes from the Dark Seal, an item that only the Death Knight drops, who uses Agarthan tech, since those voice modulators and that scythe are both items from Agarthans.

that is right, but I wonder how different dark magic is on Foldon in comparison with it on other continents? (since I consider all games to be happening in the same world) is it as vile as the ones used in Juggdrall, Valm (Valentia) and Arcanea? as corruptive in Ebile and Marabeil? does it relly on knowlodge and logic as the two I just mentioned and Telius?

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2 hours ago, darkblade2814 said:

that is right, but I wonder how different dark magic is on Foldon in comparison with it on other continents? (since I consider all games to be happening in the same world) is it as vile as the ones used in Juggdrall, Valm (Valentia) and Arcanea? as corruptive in Ebile and Marabeil? does it relly on knowlodge and logic as the two I just mentioned and Telius?

I always think that it's like Elibe talks about it. Dark magic isn't "dark" really, as it isn't "evil" magic. It's simply a case of how it is ancient, misunderstood, or unable to be handled easily. 

18 hours ago, Darkmoon6789 said:

I am actually not certain why the characters who know dark magic in the game are the ones who knows this in particular. . It is usually associated with the Agarthans, how did Lysithea learn it? Maybe Hubert studied some of their spellbooks and I am almost 100% certain that the dark magic spells known by Edelgard is because Hubert taught her. Edelgard is actually the only character in the game with both black and dark magic to my knowledge.

The reason I believe that dark magic is accessible to those with connections to Agarthans may very well be because it's simply more advanced form of magic. Remember that Agarthans actually are a much more advanced race. Their technological advancements are still using forms of magic. 

In Kaga's interview, he did state that magic is the equivalent of technology.

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6 minutes ago, omegaxis1 said:

I always think that it's like Elibe talks about it. Dark magic isn't "dark" really, as it isn't "evil" magic. It's simply a case of how it is ancient, misunderstood, or unable to be handled easily. 

The reason I believe that dark magic is accessible to those with connections to Agarthans may very well be because it's simply more advanced form of magic. Remember that Agarthans actually are a much more advanced race. Their technological advancements are still using forms of magic. 

In Kaga's interview, he did state that magic is the equivalent of technology.

still, it was dark magic that turned Cannas' brothers into vegetables, and made Nergal go insane, so it is not good for you mental health, at least, so Maybe curruptive may not be the best terms, but it's bad for your health

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