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thecrimsonflash

breath of the wild sequel discussion/analysis/hopes/predictions thread

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Honestly, what excited me most about this trailer was that it took place underground, and that there might actually be interesting full-fledged dungeons this time.

Breath of the Wild was an awesome game in its own right (though incredibly easy to trivialize), but the problem is that when it came to everything the Zelda series does well, Breath of the Wild either didn't do it at all, or did it terribly. To the point you can barely call it a Zelda game at all and it would probably be completely unrecognizable if you did a full music, model and texture swap. So I'm hoping this sequel will bring the actual Zelda back into it.

Edited by Alastor15243

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I miss the long hair. 😞
I don't hate the short hair, but I prefer the long hair.

Zelda: *do something*
Link and Ganondorf: Ah shit, here we go again.

RIP the 100% of the previous game huh ? 😛

No breakable weapon please.
And also main characters that do stuff other than being you know... please. The 'they wasted a perfect character' was strong in BotW.
Not trapping you in a place at the start, and giving you everything you need maybe ? I dunno.

Sounds like Majora's Mask, I love Majora's Mask. I hope it'll be similar to Majora's Mask.
One of my fantasy for the BotW DLCs was being able to come back in time and being able to stop Ganon ala the Moon in MM, we'll see.

I wonder how the heck did Ganondorf was stuck like that. because one, It's hardcore, and two, when a body is disapearing in a flash of light it's difficulty to make it into a mummy. 😛
No wonder Calamity Ganon come back everytime, if Gadondorf is alive as a mummy.

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I just realized something else I would like to see in BOTW-2: A bit more exploration of Link's past. BOTW gives Link all his Zelda and Champion-related memories, but there is so much more that he still doesn't remember by the end.

For example, it's mentioned in one memory that his dad was a Royal Knight (and likely the first in his family, given that Link was still treated as a commoner by some), but none of the memories show Link's dad, or his family. Perhaps trying to find more about Link's past could be a side-mission?

Another thing I'd like to see is the return of Epona (and not through Amiibo); perhaps Epona can be a reward for helping restore Lon Lon Ranch?

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just noticed, zelda has shorter hair than link in the trailer. 

I do not approve.

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Something that might be even more important to fix then breakable weapons would be the game's poor performance. The fact that BotW actually runs better in handheld mode then docked shows that someone had some really terrible priorities there.

It would be so awesome if they could get the game to run at 60 fps. This would obviously cause huge improvements in terms of game feel. But BotW also put a massive amount of effort into making the world feel organic and alive. If that world could actually move smoothly, the effect would no doubt be incredible.
Of course given how poor BotW ran, even stable 30 fps is probably a pipe dream.

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so here is something interesting I've heard, eiji aonuma when pressed about the number of playable characters refused to answer, I'm not gonna say that it means anything, but I will say that even if he is trolling us it at least does show that he is aware of the champions ballad backlash after playable zelda was deconfirmed.

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Most of all I hope they go out of their way to fix the flaws of Breath of the Wild rather than rest on their laurels due to the extremely positive reception. BOTW was not a flawless game. The sidequest were bad, the Goron and Rito plots were painfully rushed, the dungeons weren't quite a success and whatever you ended up doing the reward was always the exact same. And that was fine. It was the very first ''open sky'' world that Nintendo ever did and a period of transition for the series, meaning that there should be a certain amount of lenience for its flaws. But there should be less lenience the second time. BOTW wowed us enough to disguise some of its flaws but I don't think they can pull that again. 

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Let's see, playable Zelda, more dungeons and...no, that's pretty much it. BOTW made sandboxes feel like ACTUAL FREAKING WORLDS for the first time in forever instead of a bunch of tedious checklists (LOOKING AT YOU, UBISOFT). Just doing BOTW again is more than enough

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I just realized something else I would like to see: where's the one male Gerudo? It's a small thing, but it's a big part of the Gerudo that there is one male Gerudo born every 100 years. In Breath of the Wild, they don't really say anything about it. Does the one male have to be kicked out of the city unless he wears women's clothes? Is the one male Gerudo still given a position of respect by Gerudo society, or is that respect forever gone because of Ganondorf?

It's a small thing, but it is mysteriously absent and I think it would be neat to get answers. 

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1 hour ago, Etrurian emperor said:

He's right here

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor Ganondorf skeleton

I know you're making a joke, but I think it was clear that I wasn't talking about Ganondorf. Ganondorf is 10,000+ years old. If one male Gerudo is born every 100 years, then at least 100 male Gerudo have come and gone since Ganondorf unless Ganondorf being alive somehow prevents another male Gerudo from being born, but that makes almost no sense. 

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13 minutes ago, vanguard333 said:

I know you're making a joke, but I think it was clear that I wasn't talking about Ganondorf. Ganondorf is 10,000+ years old. If one male Gerudo is born every 100 years, then at least 100 male Gerudo have come and gone since Ganondorf unless Ganondorf being alive somehow prevents another male Gerudo from being born, but that makes almost no sense. 

To be fair, neither does them giving birth to a single man a century. It's a fantasy.

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31 minutes ago, vanguard333 said:

I know you're making a joke, but I think it was clear that I wasn't talking about Ganondorf. Ganondorf is 10,000+ years old. If one male Gerudo is born every 100 years, then at least 100 male Gerudo have come and gone since Ganondorf unless Ganondorf being alive somehow prevents another male Gerudo from being born, but that makes almost no sense. 

Half joking. I do think the one man born every 100 years is supposed to be Ganondorf. He's the only male Gerudo in all of Hyrule in all era's and timeline's and we know he can reincarnate like Link and Zelda. 

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18 minutes ago, Dai said:

To be fair, neither does them giving birth to a single man a century. It's a fantasy.

True; that's the reason why I said "almost no sense".

I'm curious about the male Gerudo thing because it is an established rule of the Gerudo that there is one male every 100 years, whereas there's nothing saying whether or not Ganondorf somehow put an end to that, either by magic or by his continued physical existence. So, all we have to go on with the information we have is that there should be one; or at least, the cycle should still be going. 

Just now, Etrurian emperor said:

Half joking. I do think the one man born every 100 years is supposed to be Ganondorf. He's the only male Gerudo in all of Hyrule in all era's and timeline's and we know he can reincarnate like Link and Zelda. 

Except the one male every 100 years was first established in Ocarina of Time as something mentioned by Nabooru to just be the nature of their people. Ganondorf was just the most recent of these rare Gerudo men (at that point). For that reason, I don't think it is Ganondorf. 

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I too would be interested in seeing a male Gerudo not Ganondorf. I did do a little lore fanfic writing on the topic once.

Spoiler
  • The Gerudo are in practical terms, a female-only race. Males are so rare, that the incidence of a male is 1 in roughly one hundred years, possibly longer, possibly slightly shorter. 
  • Although legends of omens and signs both in nature and upon the woman who will bear a Gerudo male exist, there is no irrefutable evidence saying there is any way of predicting conception and birth of a male Gerudo. 
  • But once the day comes that the woman gives birth and her child emerges, not a daughter, but a son, a solemnity fills the air, and all who witness the event firsthand are given to shock and prescribed detachment and duty.
  • Once the disbelief that a male has been born passes and they are hastily but thoroughly checked for their maleness (easy enough given genitalia, but nonetheless they need every confirmation of this once in a lifetime event), the newborn boy’s continued existence is deemed of paramount importance.
  • In cases where the birth of a son occurred in a more homely, low setting, news of the birth spread fast throughout Gerudo society. In cases where the birth happened in a more professional, high setting where it was possible to restrict who knew, secrecy was preferred. The child could be officially declared sick or even dead to conceal their maleness, and the mother would undergo similar seclusion. All women who witnessed the birth or had to assist in immediate care of the boy was was sworn to confidentiality or risk punishment.
  • Why these extreme measures? Because news of the male Gerudo birth would through as inconspicuous a chain as possible (so it could go right to the Chief, but only if it could be without it being portrayed a suspiciously urgent matter), be passed to the present matriarch of the Gerudo state.
  • Once informed, the Gerudo leader would in a way as covert as possible order that no expense be spared for the health and safety of the boy. Dozens of wet nurses, the softest warmest fabrics alone, the gentlest and most nutritional of foods, stores of every medicine for every ailment, good bodyguards and garrisons to protect and keep watch over them. The newborn boy was spared no protection from an early death. 
  • What was the meaning behind such indulgence? The great rarity of males born to the Gerudo race made them inherently auspicious, like a white elephant. A Gerudo male did possess all the strengths of a female Gerudo adjusted for the male form, but was no superhuman. Regardless of their acknowledged mortality, it was seen as a sign from the cosmos of something significant.
  • So it was fortuitous? Not exactly. The birth of a male was a positive event for the Gerudo, but at the same time it was met with some trepidation. For the male by virtue of their specialness was to come to dominate the Gerudo for as long they lived. They would be given supreme political, religious, and cultural authority. The male would be monumental, for better it was hoped, and for worse it was feared. But no Gerudo would openly sigh at the birth of a male, tremble, but not lament what it foretold. A stoicism and resilience, a resigning oneself to the their fate as a Gerudo, was strictly enforced amongst all of them.
  • Still, the birth of a male did not mean handing over the scimitar of rule to a bawling babe. There were several phases in a male Gerudo’s existence. That as the Son of the Gerudo, the Prince of the Gerudo, and then the King of the Gerudo, with an unofficial Father of the Gerudo phase ending their life.
  • The Son of the Gerudo where the boy began his life. He was born, but that was about it. During this phase, the boy was kept cloistered from society, indulged as described above. Officially, the title Son of the Gerudo was no bestowed on the boy until a passing of six or so months, or later if the boy was presently afflicted with illness. There were times in Gerudo history were the boy died in earliest infancy, that most dangerous time of life. Hence it became the standard practice that the birth of a male be kept secret for half a year or more so as to not prematurely build up emotions among the Gerudo only to see them all turn to sorrow. If the boy died during this period, they were officially unrecognized outside of the depths of Gerudo archives and its record keepers. If they died within 3 days of birth or worse were born a stillborn, they were recorded in a more dismal manner.
  • At six or so months, at last enough of the danger period had passed to warrant the public announcement, which came with the bestowing of the Son of the Gerudo title. There was no public ceremony to celebrate this, as the boy was much too important to be shown to the outside world yet. Behind the scenes, a few prayers and rites exclusive to a male Gerudo baby would be performed, but that was about it. The title “Son”, lacks any inherent notion of royalty or leadership, which was intentional. For the boy still had years to go before the full dangers of youth would pass. It would be less worse to lose a “Son” than a “Prince” or “King”.
  • Upon reaching the age of five or close to it, on a date affixed by the astrologers and others, not the boy’s actual birthday, he would undergo the ceremony elevating him from Son to Prince. At this point, the boy could now walk, could now talk, feed himself, and had even in the most rudimentary of ways begun his holistic education. The dangers of early childhood had mostly passed, and the Son would now at last be freed from his private chambers with a courtyard and see his people and his people see him. The ceremony itself was thick with ritual, with the Gerudo symbolic of every branch of society publicly swearing to protect and assist their Prince. He was adorned in some light regalia rich in precious metals, fine textiles and gems, with a very dulled and lightweight scimitar placed beside him.
  • The Prince of the Gerudo would live as this until the age of seventeen, at which he would officially undergo the long ceremony and at last become King of the Gerudo. The vows undertaken by the Gerudo here were different from the ones made at the Prince ceremony, with obey replacing assist- acknowledging the male was now mature enough to make decisions on his own. As King, he now wielded full power over his people, and could thus decide their fates, which he would until his death.
  • Politically, the birth of a boy meant little in the short term. The Chief remained the Chief, and she and any immediate successors continued to exercise power as before. Simply with the knowledge their days of top rule numbered and the wellbeing of the life of the Son becoming part and parcel of their daily affairs.
  • On elevation to Prince, the male would gradually be moved into political power. The Chief remained dominant, but with every passing year, a little more power would be devolved on the Prince, the tempo increasing as each year brought the Prince closer and closer to maturity. How quickly power devolved onto the Prince depended on his personal abilities. A more prodigal or self-centered Prince would move into co-ruler status faster than one who wasn’t.
  • Absolutism would appear to be the style of Gerudo governance once a King came to be, but was it? There certainly was potential for this to happen, stoic resignation to Kingship being the expected Gerudo reaction and all. However, there were many restrictions that effectively kept absolutism from being always absolute. 
    • For one, the King, although elevated above the rest and thoroughly immersed in Gerudo society, remained an outlier in their singular maleness. He commanded the loyalty of the females and had relatively free access to them, but was not one and yet relied on them for his rule. This is unlike the normal course of things, where men in power can rely on men to carry out their will.
    • Two, the collective body of Gerudo was female, and owing to their long long periods without a King, developed a strong sense of culture, community and state independent of monarchy. Beneath the stoic acceptance of a King’s will, the Gerudo maintained a quiet resistance that they expressed in various small ways to anything that chaffed them.
    • Three, the King too had his entire life since birth left in the care of women, who could through this exercise lifelong influences over him. Political factions could and did arise over the proper course for a Son/Prince’s upbringing and later the King’s heart and mind, with the females trying to exert their will through their male master.
  • Often when a King of the Gerudo grew old, he unofficially became the Father of the Gerudo. A phase marked simply as the decline of their rule. The King was still King and still had massive power, but the effects of old age took their toll and forced him to rely more on the Gerudo collective in practice. Being it so males were born so very rarely and lifespans only so long, the man could never name a male successor, since there would be none existing. There may have been one particularly extraordinary existence of a male born whilst another was alive in oldest age. This effectively meant the reprieve from kingship was much weaker, but being the monarch so old at the time of the new male birth that he would have little control over the heir’s upbringing. The usual course was that the King chose the new female Chief who would rule following his death. But once dead, the Chief could be disposed of as desired by the communal whole.
  • As the lone male in a population of women, the Son/Prince/King of the Gerudo had no shortage of available mates. Whereas Gerudo women had to marry Hylian men, the King of the Gerudo was forbidden from pursuing relationships with non-Gerudo, even if he sought it. Any child born of such a relationship was for all his virility still destined to be a Gerudo female anyhow. The King of the Gerudo could choose his mates and name a royal wife, but he could not have a de facto harem, he had no concubines, all of “his” women were free to live their normal lives without being bound to restricted chambers. Nor was rape tolerated as proper kingly behavior and the Gerudo could call him out on it, restricting his sexual access, but not banning him entirely from his bedroom activities. The King did produce a significant number of daughters however, and could even give daughters to women married to Hylians. And many Gerudo women willingly chose to have intercourse with the King and bear his daughters. It did not matter if the King did not always enjoy copulation, every King found themselves obligated to do it on at least a semi-frequent basis. The reason? The Gerudo, though sharing the powerful Gerudo genes passed on from generation to generation, without any males could not actually intermarry, so each marticlan grew increasingly distant from each other and the Gerudo line symbolically thinned. This was why the title Father of the Gerudo came to be, by the time a King reached old age, he had produced a great number of daughters and was hence the father to many. Through reproduction, the King strengthened the blood bonds between the Gerudo inasmuch as he could. This was an act only he could do, and he was expected to do it. If there was an asexual or gay King somewhere in the history of the Gerudo, he still had more sex than many straight men ever would. The King would truly have to be infirm mentally or physically to skip on the blood linkage duty.
  • The relation of the Son/Prince/King to his family was atypical for a Gerudo. What was typical was that he was divorced from his father, who despite having sired a such a great rarity, was by virtue of his maleness-Hylianess not welcomed at all into Gerudo society. The Son even as King had no right to invite his father into the Gerudo realm, and the Son was generally denied knowledge of his father’s name even, for he belonged not to Hylian society at all, only that of the Gerudo. Fathers who learned of whom they had sired, saw any attempt they made to benefit from it easily thwarted, one Son, in obedience to Gerudo custom, went so far as to have his braggart father killed.
  • The relation of the Son to his mother fluctuated through Gerudo history. If there was the smallest sign of weakness or illness in the mother upon the boy’s birth, he was immediately removed to the care of wet nurses other than her, which he would have anyhow. The boy belonged not to his mother, but to the Gerudo collectively, he was a public individual by birth, a private life was not his. This is not to say the boy could never see his mother, it depended on the nature of the growing boy and the mother herself as to how close they were. Sometimes they forged close intimate bonds, other times they remained strangers to each other. If the mother was able to learn the ways of politics, that generally worked well in her favor, as she could leverage her motherhood of the Son, which carried a small title, but nonetheless a title, with it.
  • The mother of a Son was not forbidden to produce further children, as they would inevitably be daughters. These daughters were not Princesses, they were just like any other Gerudo. As sisters to the Son, they did if they had the talent to exert some influence over their brother, whom they would always address by proper formal title and not as their relative. The King was forbidden from sexual contact with his sisters, being that it would be incest. Nonetheless, given incest was a once in a hundred years thing with Gerudo, save a daughter consort with her pure Hylian half brothers or cousins, the rare rare instance (for there is a record of it having happened) that a King knew his sister was deeply frowned on, but the daughter was allowed to live if forever bearing a stigma she had no control over.
  • The descendants of a King of the Gerudo were considered no different from those women who were not. The reality did differ according to the quality of the King in the eyes of his subjects. A good king would be a descendant that a Gerudo would be proud to have and mark on their genealogies, it offered a societal boost, to the point that social cliques of those not related to the good king and who were could form. To complicate matters, people obsessed with showing their lineage to the good king, if they were his daughters or not, would trace their maternal lineage to the closest grandmother they shared with the king (and of course, the sisters and nieces of the king could cherish that position). But at the end of the day, matriclan bonds and merit mattered much more in Gerudo society, the universal sisterhood would in the big picture override kingly connections. A bad or feeble king would be ignored, and the other Gerudo would treat those born of the flawed king with no outcast status.
  • The King of the Gerudo was usually aloof from the women he mated with. The King was not supposed to play favorites with his subjects, he was supposed to view all of them as equals and treat them equally according to the veracity and merit of their being. Politics entering the picture, the King would not always make judgment calls based purely on what was true and what was best for the Gerudo. Likewise, in personal relations, the King was not so cold all the time. The position of Royal Wife (not Queen) was invented and accepted by the Gerudo, with its point being to funnel the King’s favoritism into a singular individual. The King never needed a formal ceremony for marriage, simply willing her to the position of Royal Wife with her consent would do it. The Royal Wife could be changed at any time, but normally kings would stick with a particular favorite and keep them there barring a major falling out. The King could truly romantically love the women who he took to bed, and the Gerudo could romantically fall for their king in return, despite duty demanding him being publicly impartial.
  • The daughters of the King were supposed to be treated much like their mothers, impartially. Some kings were just this, be it out of an absence of love or tradition. Though of course, kings could develop candor and close bonds with their daughters. Lavish gifts at the sacrifice of the Gerudo collective were forbidden to them, but reality permitted a daughter of a king to receive finer living quarters and quantities of finery and luxury- but within limits. Rather than oppose the King himself, the daughter if old enough to be self-responsible tended to receive the majority of the criticism for decadence, the King being nominally unrestricted. If she was given five percent of the Gerudo’s coffers as her yearly allowance, she was almost obligated to spend that large fortune on the community. If she spent it all on herself, she would be informally ostracized, and might even be subject to frequent household thefts. To keep the beloved daughters of a King from exerting too much influence in the long run, a King of the Gerudo’s Last Will was bound by major provisions curtailing inheritance.

I've no expectations for this game, I try to curtail them for all games, but I do hope for improvements.

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19 minutes ago, Interdimensional Observer said:

I too would be interested in seeing a male Gerudo not Ganondorf. I did do a little lore fanfic writing on the topic once.

  Hide contents
  • The Gerudo are in practical terms, a female-only race. Males are so rare, that the incidence of a male is 1 in roughly one hundred years, possibly longer, possibly slightly shorter. 
  • Although legends of omens and signs both in nature and upon the woman who will bear a Gerudo male exist, there is no irrefutable evidence saying there is any way of predicting conception and birth of a male Gerudo. 
  • But once the day comes that the woman gives birth and her child emerges, not a daughter, but a son, a solemnity fills the air, and all who witness the event firsthand are given to shock and prescribed detachment and duty.
  • Once the disbelief that a male has been born passes and they are hastily but thoroughly checked for their maleness (easy enough given genitalia, but nonetheless they need every confirmation of this once in a lifetime event), the newborn boy’s continued existence is deemed of paramount importance.
  • In cases where the birth of a son occurred in a more homely, low setting, news of the birth spread fast throughout Gerudo society. In cases where the birth happened in a more professional, high setting where it was possible to restrict who knew, secrecy was preferred. The child could be officially declared sick or even dead to conceal their maleness, and the mother would undergo similar seclusion. All women who witnessed the birth or had to assist in immediate care of the boy was was sworn to confidentiality or risk punishment.
  • Why these extreme measures? Because news of the male Gerudo birth would through as inconspicuous a chain as possible (so it could go right to the Chief, but only if it could be without it being portrayed a suspiciously urgent matter), be passed to the present matriarch of the Gerudo state.
  • Once informed, the Gerudo leader would in a way as covert as possible order that no expense be spared for the health and safety of the boy. Dozens of wet nurses, the softest warmest fabrics alone, the gentlest and most nutritional of foods, stores of every medicine for every ailment, good bodyguards and garrisons to protect and keep watch over them. The newborn boy was spared no protection from an early death. 
  • What was the meaning behind such indulgence? The great rarity of males born to the Gerudo race made them inherently auspicious, like a white elephant. A Gerudo male did possess all the strengths of a female Gerudo adjusted for the male form, but was no superhuman. Regardless of their acknowledged mortality, it was seen as a sign from the cosmos of something significant.
  • So it was fortuitous? Not exactly. The birth of a male was a positive event for the Gerudo, but at the same time it was met with some trepidation. For the male by virtue of their specialness was to come to dominate the Gerudo for as long they lived. They would be given supreme political, religious, and cultural authority. The male would be monumental, for better it was hoped, and for worse it was feared. But no Gerudo would openly sigh at the birth of a male, tremble, but not lament what it foretold. A stoicism and resilience, a resigning oneself to the their fate as a Gerudo, was strictly enforced amongst all of them.
  • Still, the birth of a male did not mean handing over the scimitar of rule to a bawling babe. There were several phases in a male Gerudo’s existence. That as the Son of the Gerudo, the Prince of the Gerudo, and then the King of the Gerudo, with an unofficial Father of the Gerudo phase ending their life.
  • The Son of the Gerudo where the boy began his life. He was born, but that was about it. During this phase, the boy was kept cloistered from society, indulged as described above. Officially, the title Son of the Gerudo was no bestowed on the boy until a passing of six or so months, or later if the boy was presently afflicted with illness. There were times in Gerudo history were the boy died in earliest infancy, that most dangerous time of life. Hence it became the standard practice that the birth of a male be kept secret for half a year or more so as to not prematurely build up emotions among the Gerudo only to see them all turn to sorrow. If the boy died during this period, they were officially unrecognized outside of the depths of Gerudo archives and its record keepers. If they died within 3 days of birth or worse were born a stillborn, they were recorded in a more dismal manner.
  • At six or so months, at last enough of the danger period had passed to warrant the public announcement, which came with the bestowing of the Son of the Gerudo title. There was no public ceremony to celebrate this, as the boy was much too important to be shown to the outside world yet. Behind the scenes, a few prayers and rites exclusive to a male Gerudo baby would be performed, but that was about it. The title “Son”, lacks any inherent notion of royalty or leadership, which was intentional. For the boy still had years to go before the full dangers of youth would pass. It would be less worse to lose a “Son” than a “Prince” or “King”.
  • Upon reaching the age of five or close to it, on a date affixed by the astrologers and others, not the boy’s actual birthday, he would undergo the ceremony elevating him from Son to Prince. At this point, the boy could now walk, could now talk, feed himself, and had even in the most rudimentary of ways begun his holistic education. The dangers of early childhood had mostly passed, and the Son would now at last be freed from his private chambers with a courtyard and see his people and his people see him. The ceremony itself was thick with ritual, with the Gerudo symbolic of every branch of society publicly swearing to protect and assist their Prince. He was adorned in some light regalia rich in precious metals, fine textiles and gems, with a very dulled and lightweight scimitar placed beside him.
  • The Prince of the Gerudo would live as this until the age of seventeen, at which he would officially undergo the long ceremony and at last become King of the Gerudo. The vows undertaken by the Gerudo here were different from the ones made at the Prince ceremony, with obey replacing assist- acknowledging the male was now mature enough to make decisions on his own. As King, he now wielded full power over his people, and could thus decide their fates, which he would until his death.
  • Politically, the birth of a boy meant little in the short term. The Chief remained the Chief, and she and any immediate successors continued to exercise power as before. Simply with the knowledge their days of top rule numbered and the wellbeing of the life of the Son becoming part and parcel of their daily affairs.
  • On elevation to Prince, the male would gradually be moved into political power. The Chief remained dominant, but with every passing year, a little more power would be devolved on the Prince, the tempo increasing as each year brought the Prince closer and closer to maturity. How quickly power devolved onto the Prince depended on his personal abilities. A more prodigal or self-centered Prince would move into co-ruler status faster than one who wasn’t.
  • Absolutism would appear to be the style of Gerudo governance once a King came to be, but was it? There certainly was potential for this to happen, stoic resignation to Kingship being the expected Gerudo reaction and all. However, there were many restrictions that effectively kept absolutism from being always absolute. 
    • For one, the King, although elevated above the rest and thoroughly immersed in Gerudo society, remained an outlier in their singular maleness. He commanded the loyalty of the females and had relatively free access to them, but was not one and yet relied on them for his rule. This is unlike the normal course of things, where men in power can rely on men to carry out their will.
    • Two, the collective body of Gerudo was female, and owing to their long long periods without a King, developed a strong sense of culture, community and state independent of monarchy. Beneath the stoic acceptance of a King’s will, the Gerudo maintained a quiet resistance that they expressed in various small ways to anything that chaffed them.
    • Three, the King too had his entire life since birth left in the care of women, who could through this exercise lifelong influences over him. Political factions could and did arise over the proper course for a Son/Prince’s upbringing and later the King’s heart and mind, with the females trying to exert their will through their male master.
  • Often when a King of the Gerudo grew old, he unofficially became the Father of the Gerudo. A phase marked simply as the decline of their rule. The King was still King and still had massive power, but the effects of old age took their toll and forced him to rely more on the Gerudo collective in practice. Being it so males were born so very rarely and lifespans only so long, the man could never name a male successor, since there would be none existing. There may have been one particularly extraordinary existence of a male born whilst another was alive in oldest age. This effectively meant the reprieve from kingship was much weaker, but being the monarch so old at the time of the new male birth that he would have little control over the heir’s upbringing. The usual course was that the King chose the new female Chief who would rule following his death. But once dead, the Chief could be disposed of as desired by the communal whole.
  • As the lone male in a population of women, the Son/Prince/King of the Gerudo had no shortage of available mates. Whereas Gerudo women had to marry Hylian men, the King of the Gerudo was forbidden from pursuing relationships with non-Gerudo, even if he sought it. Any child born of such a relationship was for all his virility still destined to be a Gerudo female anyhow. The King of the Gerudo could choose his mates and name a royal wife, but he could not have a de facto harem, he had no concubines, all of “his” women were free to live their normal lives without being bound to restricted chambers. Nor was rape tolerated as proper kingly behavior and the Gerudo could call him out on it, restricting his sexual access, but not banning him entirely from his bedroom activities. The King did produce a significant number of daughters however, and could even give daughters to women married to Hylians. And many Gerudo women willingly chose to have intercourse with the King and bear his daughters. It did not matter if the King did not always enjoy copulation, every King found themselves obligated to do it on at least a semi-frequent basis. The reason? The Gerudo, though sharing the powerful Gerudo genes passed on from generation to generation, without any males could not actually intermarry, so each marticlan grew increasingly distant from each other and the Gerudo line symbolically thinned. This was why the title Father of the Gerudo came to be, by the time a King reached old age, he had produced a great number of daughters and was hence the father to many. Through reproduction, the King strengthened the blood bonds between the Gerudo inasmuch as he could. This was an act only he could do, and he was expected to do it. If there was an asexual or gay King somewhere in the history of the Gerudo, he still had more sex than many straight men ever would. The King would truly have to be infirm mentally or physically to skip on the blood linkage duty.
  • The relation of the Son/Prince/King to his family was atypical for a Gerudo. What was typical was that he was divorced from his father, who despite having sired a such a great rarity, was by virtue of his maleness-Hylianess not welcomed at all into Gerudo society. The Son even as King had no right to invite his father into the Gerudo realm, and the Son was generally denied knowledge of his father’s name even, for he belonged not to Hylian society at all, only that of the Gerudo. Fathers who learned of whom they had sired, saw any attempt they made to benefit from it easily thwarted, one Son, in obedience to Gerudo custom, went so far as to have his braggart father killed.
  • The relation of the Son to his mother fluctuated through Gerudo history. If there was the smallest sign of weakness or illness in the mother upon the boy’s birth, he was immediately removed to the care of wet nurses other than her, which he would have anyhow. The boy belonged not to his mother, but to the Gerudo collectively, he was a public individual by birth, a private life was not his. This is not to say the boy could never see his mother, it depended on the nature of the growing boy and the mother herself as to how close they were. Sometimes they forged close intimate bonds, other times they remained strangers to each other. If the mother was able to learn the ways of politics, that generally worked well in her favor, as she could leverage her motherhood of the Son, which carried a small title, but nonetheless a title, with it.
  • The mother of a Son was not forbidden to produce further children, as they would inevitably be daughters. These daughters were not Princesses, they were just like any other Gerudo. As sisters to the Son, they did if they had the talent to exert some influence over their brother, whom they would always address by proper formal title and not as their relative. The King was forbidden from sexual contact with his sisters, being that it would be incest. Nonetheless, given incest was a once in a hundred years thing with Gerudo, save a daughter consort with her pure Hylian half brothers or cousins, the rare rare instance (for there is a record of it having happened) that a King knew his sister was deeply frowned on, but the daughter was allowed to live if forever bearing a stigma she had no control over.
  • The descendants of a King of the Gerudo were considered no different from those women who were not. The reality did differ according to the quality of the King in the eyes of his subjects. A good king would be a descendant that a Gerudo would be proud to have and mark on their genealogies, it offered a societal boost, to the point that social cliques of those not related to the good king and who were could form. To complicate matters, people obsessed with showing their lineage to the good king, if they were his daughters or not, would trace their maternal lineage to the closest grandmother they shared with the king (and of course, the sisters and nieces of the king could cherish that position). But at the end of the day, matriclan bonds and merit mattered much more in Gerudo society, the universal sisterhood would in the big picture override kingly connections. A bad or feeble king would be ignored, and the other Gerudo would treat those born of the flawed king with no outcast status.
  • The King of the Gerudo was usually aloof from the women he mated with. The King was not supposed to play favorites with his subjects, he was supposed to view all of them as equals and treat them equally according to the veracity and merit of their being. Politics entering the picture, the King would not always make judgment calls based purely on what was true and what was best for the Gerudo. Likewise, in personal relations, the King was not so cold all the time. The position of Royal Wife (not Queen) was invented and accepted by the Gerudo, with its point being to funnel the King’s favoritism into a singular individual. The King never needed a formal ceremony for marriage, simply willing her to the position of Royal Wife with her consent would do it. The Royal Wife could be changed at any time, but normally kings would stick with a particular favorite and keep them there barring a major falling out. The King could truly romantically love the women who he took to bed, and the Gerudo could romantically fall for their king in return, despite duty demanding him being publicly impartial.
  • The daughters of the King were supposed to be treated much like their mothers, impartially. Some kings were just this, be it out of an absence of love or tradition. Though of course, kings could develop candor and close bonds with their daughters. Lavish gifts at the sacrifice of the Gerudo collective were forbidden to them, but reality permitted a daughter of a king to receive finer living quarters and quantities of finery and luxury- but within limits. Rather than oppose the King himself, the daughter if old enough to be self-responsible tended to receive the majority of the criticism for decadence, the King being nominally unrestricted. If she was given five percent of the Gerudo’s coffers as her yearly allowance, she was almost obligated to spend that large fortune on the community. If she spent it all on herself, she would be informally ostracized, and might even be subject to frequent household thefts. To keep the beloved daughters of a King from exerting too much influence in the long run, a King of the Gerudo’s Last Will was bound by major provisions curtailing inheritance.

I've no expectations for this game, I try to curtail them for all games, but I do hope for improvements.

Huh; interesting. So, it's basically the bit of lore Ocarina of Time gave, but with a lot more detail. 

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On 6/11/2019 at 7:06 PM, Glaceon Mage said:

I wonder if the magical caves are gonna be the centerpoint of the exploration, BotW honestly didn't have much in the way of caves actually.  

Like, there can be magical ice caves, and lava caves, and ruins caves, etc.  

Oh; caves and other underground could actually be really interesting. Assuming the glider comes back, caves would limit the usefulness of climbing and gliding without making them completely useless. Plus, as you pointed out, there can be all kinds of different underground areas. One that I thought of would be a vast underground reservoir that provides underwater mechanics and verticality. 

Plus, there are so many things they could do with underground exploration: light as a resource, multiple hallways, etc.

Not only this, but opening up the underground could pave the way for new or returning Zelda races. Deku Scrubs, Mogmas, etc., could all potentially see a return. 

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On 6/15/2019 at 6:13 PM, Aiddon said:

Let's see, playable Zelda, more dungeons and...no, that's pretty much it. BOTW made sandboxes feel like ACTUAL FREAKING WORLDS for the first time in forever instead of a bunch of tedious checklists (LOOKING AT YOU, UBISOFT). Just doing BOTW again is more than enough

Not only that, but finally a mainstream Zelda was not YET, ANOTHER, OCARINA, OF, TIME, RIPOFF. Seriously, leave OOT alone for once 🙄. However, this next installment couldn’t go wrong with actual Zelda flavors regarding the dungeons. I do admit the main dungeon were a weak part of BOTW

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As far as Dungeons go I would like to see BOTW's Hyrule castle as the dungeon temple. Fill the world with huge imposing structures that are daunting to enter but can be infiltrated from all different angles until you find the infiltration route most suitable to your current gear and skill. Hyrule castle was a personal highlight of BOTW for me so I would like to see more dungeon similar to it. It would create more interesting locations than the rather boring divine beast and maintain that sense of freedom that BOTW was so good at. 

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Anyone here good at programming? Nintendo has listed some job openings for this game:

http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2019/07/nintendo_posts_job_listings_for_zelda_breath_of_the_wild_sequel_dungeon_designers

Two jobs: a 3DCG Designer, and a Level Designer. Applications for the first job will be accepted until September 30th this year.

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